Teacher Candidate Collaboration- Outline for a Place-Based Learning Opportunity

Collaborative Inquiry-Based Learning Experience: Wanuskewin Heritage Park

Sydni Thorpe, Lisa Button, Shelby Buell, Alyssa Wingerter, Brittany Bodnarchuk, Kashtin Moen, Raelynn Falcon

 

Demographics: Grade 9 & 10 (30 students each)

Subject Areas Incorporated: Science 9 & 10, Home Ec. 9, Foods 10, Indigenous Studies 10, Arts Education 9, Drama 9, ELA 9 & A10, Social Studies 9.

 

Our students will spend a day exploring and completing numerous educational tasks at Wanuskewin Heritage Park. We have planned for numerous activities surrounding this trip:

 

Fund Raising: In order to fund the trip, Home Ec. Students will work together to organize fund raisers such as bake sales and lunch specials. This will not only help to hit some of the Home Ec. And Foods outcomes, but will also work to create a student-based “field trip fund” that can be put towards the Tours/activities at Wanuskewin.

 

Tipi Raising: The Tipi Raising tour at Wanuskewin would be beneficial for students in the above grade 9 courses. They will attend the tour and then complete a number of reflective assessment pieces once the day is over.

 

Medicine Walk: The Medicine Walk tour would be beneficial for students in Grade 10 classes.

 

Bannock Bake: The Bannock Bake offered at Wanuskewin would be beneficial for our Home Ec. And Foods students. It is also a great opportunity that all students can complete in a relatively short time frame (over lunch hour).

 

Scavenger Hunt: After the above Tours are completed, we wanted to give students the freedom to explore the land on their own. We will offer them a list of objects, sights, plant life, etc. that they will look for on their independent hikes and take pictures of so that they can be added to a collective reflection at the end of our trip (such as a Class Dojo or Twitter page). This gives the students the agency to move around, explore, and learn on their own, but also ensures that they won’t miss key elements of the experience.

 

Think-Pair-Share: On the bus ride home, students will be asked to perform a quick Think-Pair-Share activity with their partners to reflect on their favourite aspects of the experience and their newfound knowledge.

 

Creative Inquiry Project: Over the next few days, students will do numerous short activities throughout their classes reflecting on their experiences at Wanuskewin. We will only assign one collective Inquiry project, as we figured it wouldn’t be fair to assign multiple projects at once. Arts Education, English Language Arts, and Drama teachers will come together to outline an Inquiry Project in which students have the opportunity to hit Outcomes in all of these areas. Students will be expected to draw from the inspiration and knowledge gained at Wanuskewin to create a project of their own design.

 

 

 

Drama- Emotional Recall

This was one of the first drama lessons I created and shows how I started in comparison to the lesson plan work that I do later on. It also shows how the style of my lesson plans have changed as I have progressed further in the education “rabbit hole.”

Lesson Plan

Date: Undetermined

Subject: Drama 20/30             based on the Drama 10, 20, 30 Curriculum

Grade: 11/12 Split

Topic:  Emotional Recall through Guided Meditation

Materials: 1. Body and Mind

  1. Floor Space
Stage 1- Desired Results – you may use student friendly language
Broad Areas of Learning

       Lifelong learners

       Self and Community

       Engaged Citizens

Cross Curricular Competencies

Developing Social Responsibility

       Use moral reasoning processes

       Engage in communitarian thinking and dialogue

Developing Literacies

       Construct knowledge related to various literacies

       Explore and interpret the world using various literacies

       Express understanding and communicate meaning using various literacies

Developing Identity/Interdependence

       Understand, value, and care for oneself (intellectually, emotionally, physically, spiritually)

       Understand, value, and care for others

Developing Thinking

       Think and learn contextually

       Think and learn creatively



 

What do they need to understand, know, and/or able to do?

1.      Students must be able to enhance character development through the use of emotional recall techniques

2.      Students will call on memories and details from a similar situation (or more recently a situation with similar emotions) and import those feelings/experiences to those of their character

3.      Bring emotion and personality to the stage and call upon it when playing their character

Outcome(s):

1.      Acquire increased knowledge of others, themselves and the world around them

2.      Develop acting skills

3.      Understand the role of drama in various cultures, past and present

Indicators:

1.      recall and respond to drama experiences

2.      develop increasing commitment to their own roles and the roles of others

2.      begin to develop breath control

3.      understand that today’s dramatic artists are influenced by various theatre traditions

3.   understand that theatre, past and present, can teach us about ourselves

3.  understand the universality of certain themes, characters and situations in dramatic expression through the ages

3. understand that through theatre history they can discover various acting styles

 

PGP Goals (and what evidence in the lesson will show that you have achieved the target?):

 

1.3       a commitment to social justice and the capacity to nurture an inclusive and equitable environment for the empowerment of all learners; and – Showing compassion and kindness to one another in the classroom after the exercise. Supporting those in the classroom that were particularly affected by the exercise.
1.4       a commitment to service and the capacity to be reflective, lifelong learners and inquirers. – The discussion after the completion of the Emotional Recall exercise to see if students respected the assignment and felt it was valuable to them as learners. Student provided feedback on what worked and did not for them will allow me to revamp/emphasize strengths.
2.2       proficiency in the Language of Instruction; -Ability to import my knowledge of emotional recall into my students. The inclusion of a greater range and/or depth of emotion into student performances will designate the success of this goal.
Stage 2- Assessment
Assessment FOR Learning (formative) Assess the students during the learning to help determine next steps. 

Observations of the effects (emotional expression) of the guided meditation into each individuals journey through emotional recall.

Assessment OF Learning (summative) Assess the students after learning to evaluate what they have learned.

Discussion on the effectiveness/ value of emotional recall after the activity was completed. Discussion on the potential dangers (cautions) of emotional recall.

Stage 3- Procedures:

Accommodations – which students require differentiation and what kind Modifications – how have you planned to accommodate the student’s needs
-This can be a very emotional and scary experience for students that have had previous traumas/ bad experiences within their lives (At-Risk students).

-There may be students that cannot lie on the floor for extended periods of time if at all.

 

 

-Before the activity begins, I let students know that at any time within the exercise, if it gets to real/ scary/ emotionally overbearing, then they can sit up and take a breather effectively coming out of the exercise. This is very important because students need to feel safe and, sometimes, emotional recall activities can bring up past events that students did not feel safe in. Therefore, they need to have the opportunity at ANY time to come out of the exercise and back into the safe space within the drama classroom. Further, it is important to let them know that that is okay and in no way will negatively affect their grade/ or how they are viewed.

-It is perfectly fine to do this activity sitting in a chair (preferably their feet should be grounded into the floor).

 

Motivational/Anticipatory Set (introducing topic while engaging the students)

-There are 10 minute student led warm ups to start class (These go everyday so I factor this into my lesson).

-After the student warmup, I will lead a “warmup” exercise where students lay on the ground and do a few stretches (Ankle rock, “reaching” stretches, head tilts, and floor “shakes”). This will effectively begin to prepare students body and minds for the activities coming up. (5 Mins)

-The second part of my warmup entails a “calm down” that is based on breathing and clearing the mind for the emotional recall. I lead a guided meditation in which students focus on breath and slowly develop deep breathing which both calms and prepares the mind for the next task. (5 Mins)

 

Main Procedures/Strategies:

After the warmup and calm down, we will begin the Emotional Recall. I use vocal encouragement to walk students through their senses and encourage them to think about the way in which they mentally, physically, and emotionally responded to the recalled memory/emotion.

The first emotion being Anger (5 Mins).

The second emotion is Sadness (5 Mins). (This is a possible trigger emotion for students. Be very wary of students that are sitting up or are emotionally distraught.)

The third and final emotion explored today is Happiness (5 Mins). (Good way to end on an emotional upswing. This helps to relieve some of the tension/ sadness in the room.)

 

Closing of lesson:

To finish the recall exercise, I lead a cool down exercise (5 Mins) that combined the two warmup exercises. We begin the exiting from the Emotional Recall slowly because, if done too quickly, the feeling in the room dissipates and the experience can be lost. Therefore, we begin to slowly focus on breathing again and focus (specifically) on taking a few deep breaths in through the nose and out through the mouth. After taking a few deep breaths, we slowly begin to stretch using the same stretches as before to slowly bring us out of the exercise and back into the room. To end the activity off, I have students SLOWLY roll over, push themselves up to sitting on their heels, and then very slowly (30 second count) come to standing doing a vertebrae back stretch.

-A quick discussion on the effectiveness/ value of emotional recall after the activity was completed. Discussion on the potential dangers (cautions) of emotional recall was also explored. (5 Mins)

-Because of the draining effect of emotional recall on the body, I feel it is valuable to end the class with 15 mins of Improv games to help alleviate the tension within the room and the residual tension from the emotional recall on the individual as well.

 

Personal Reflection:

 

Emotional Recall can be a very interesting exercise to take into a classroom. It can go very well or it can go horribly bad. Thankfully, I believe that, in this case, my lesson on emotional recall went well. The students echoed this sentiment as well which means that I can feel assured that it was at the least minimally effective. When I originally began creating this lesson, I had decided to do a movement exercise after the emotional recall to help my partner teacher introduce the idea of physicality to the students. However, I figured that introducing such a heavy concept without a cool down period after could have made the movement exercise be detrimental to the actual emotional recall process. Therefore, I opted to include an improvisation exercise after to help bring a better, happier overall mood to the room at the end of the emotional recall lesson. The way in which I connected this lesson to the future physicality lesson was to discuss with the students the way emotion influences our physicality. Example: when someone is angry, there is a higher possibility of clenching the teeth together and, therefore, a tightness, pointedness, and sharpness within the facial expressions and body/ movement is registered. I believe that I successfully hit my goal of having the students fully immersed within this activity and hopefully they can continue to add dimensions into their acting by using this actor tool of Emotional Recall. I believe that I will continue to use this lesson in the future. I may add a few other emotions if I was doing this lesson for a second time with the same students to give them a greater variety of emotions to draw upon. I would also keep the Improv at the end of the lesson to relieve tension within the class. I would introduce the movement exercise the next day so that the emotional recall exercise is fresh in their minds heading into this other assignment. I am very happy with how this lesson went and the students seemed to enjoy and appreciate the material which added another layer of success to this lesson.

Role Playing- Mock Interviews “Word Sneak”

Lesson Plan Title: Role Playing- Mock Interviews “Word Sneak”                                              

Date: Undetermined   Subject: ELA/ Drama             Grade:  7/8        Topic: Drama

Materials: Bodies, Pen, Chairs, Paper, Whiteboard and markers    Time: Approx. 45 mins

Essential Question: How does role playing using the dramatic arts function as a catalyst for learning about self, others, other subjects, and the world.

Stage 1- Desired Results – you may use student friendly language
What do they need to understand, know, and/or able to do?

How does role playing help you learn about yourself, others, other subjects, and the world.

Demonstrate confidence and improvisation skills- How practicing the interview setting using drama can build confidence and improvisation skills that apply to real world interview settings.

 

Broad Areas of Learning:

Developing Lifelong Learners-

As students engage in meaningful cultural and artistic inquiry within schools and communities, they are able to gain a depth of understanding about the world and human experience that enables them to become more knowledgeable, confident, and creative lifelong learners.

Developing a Sense of Self and Community-

Students who possess a positive identity, and understand how their identity is shaped by their interactions with others and their environment, are able to nurture meaningful relationships, and appreciate various worldviews.

Developing Engaged Citizens-

Gives students multiple ways to express their views and to reflect on the perspectives and experiences of others. Students learn how to design, compose, problem solve, inspire change, and contribute innovative ideas that can improve the quality of their own lives and the lives of others.

 

Cross-Curricular Competencies:

Developing Thinking-

Understanding develops by building on what is already known, and by initiating and engaging in contextual thinking, creative thinking, and critical reasoning. Arts education also involves interdisciplinary thinking wherein students make connections among the arts and other disciplines. Arts education is taught and learned through an inquiry approach that engages students in thinking about big ideas, asking compelling questions, seeking information, investigating and applying disciplinary concepts, experimenting, problem solving, constructing understanding, communicating, and interpreting meaning through creative and critical thinking processes.

Think and learn contextually- Students have to demonstrate their ability to speak confidently and use improvisation skills to successfully navigate interview conversations. They will also need to think how to shape their conversations contextually based on their words and who is running the interview (Problem Solving and Communicating Skills)

Think and learn creatively- Students have to demonstrate creative thinking in order to structure conversation to successfully include their words into the interview setting as casually as possible. (Experimenting and Creating Skills)

Developing Identity and Interdependence-

Examines perspectives on social and cultural norms and expectations, and investigating the potential for individual and group accomplishments. It also assumes the possession of a positive self-concept and sense of identity, and the ability to live/ work in harmony with others and with the natural and constructed world (this is what they are creating).

Developing Literacies-

Addresses a variety of ways to interpret the world and express understanding through words, numbers, images, sounds, movements, and technologies in various situations. Literacies in arts education involve the ability to investigate, structure, and express ideas, and interpret meaning, using the specific language of each arts discipline (drama).

Developing Social Responsibility-

This competency addresses how people contribute positively to their physical, social, and cultural environments. It requires the ability to contribute to the well-being of self, others, and the natural world, and participate with others in accomplishing shared goals.

 

Outcome(s):

Grade 7’s

Arts (Drama)- CP7.4 Investigate how dramatic character develops from role.

– Demonstrate confidence and imagination when working in various roles.

– Investigate when in role how character may be expressed through actions.

– Demonstrate when in role how characters use actions or interact with others for different purposes.

 

Arts (Drama)- CP7.5 Use drama elements, strategies, negotiation, and collaboration to help shape the direction of the drama and/or collective creation.

– Identify and discuss the importance of focus to successful drama work.

– Explain how drama work helps to develop a deeper understanding of communication and creative interdependence.

 

ELA- CC7.8 Write to describe a person; to narrate an imaginary incident or story; to explain and inform in a news story, a factual account, and a business letter; to persuade in a letter and in interpretation of a text.

 

Grade 8’s

Arts (Drama)-CP8.4 Demonstrate how dramatic characters interact in relationships within the drama and/or collective creation

– Sustain belief in own roles and in the roles assumed by others for extended periods of time.

– Demonstrate confidence and curiosity when assuming different kinds of roles in drama work

 

Arts (Drama)- CP8.5 Investigate how theatrical elements (e.g., story, character, design, space) are combined to achieve dramatic purpose

-Demonstrate imagination when creating imaginary places and situations in own drama work.

 

ELA- CC8.8 Write to describe a landscape scene; to narrate a personal story or anecdote and a historical narrative; to explain and inform in a presentation of findings, a biography, a documented research report, and a résumé and covering letter; and to persuade in a mini-debate and a review.

Create descriptive texts (e.g., a landscape scene) as follows:

Present a clear and colourful picture of the place

Include sensory details and vivid words

Use a logical order (e.g., near to far).

PGP Goals:

1.2       ethical behaviour and the ability to work in a collaborative manner for the good of all learners– This lesson is a collaborative effort by the class to help one another learn interviewing skills through doing a drama activity. Drama is, in almost all aspects, a collaborative approach and, through the use of drama, will allow the students to learn in a variety of ways such as kinesthetically, visually, and orally.

1.3       a commitment to social justice and the capacity to nurture an inclusive and equitable environment for the empowerment of all learners– In my opinion, this is the number one PGP goal for all drama classes. It is incredibly important to establish a safe space for students to learn. Drama is a great way to include all learners because of the variety of learning styles that drama touches on such as kinesthetically, visually, and orally. Therefore, students and teacher are able to help one another learn which, in turn, creates a positive learning environment for the empowerment of not only the students but the teacher as well.

2.4       ability to use technologies readily, strategically and appropriately– Use of the smartboard for the displaying of my own video as well as the incorporation of the IPads for students to use thesaurus.com.

2.5       knowledge of a number of subjects taught in Saskatchewan schools (disciplinary/interdisciplinary knowledge)- This lesson is a bridge between both Arts (Drama) and English curricular material.

3.1       the ability to utilize meaningful, equitable and holistic approaches to assessment and evaluation– By allowing the students to demonstrate or acquire knowledge about interviewing processes through drama activities, the students do not have to worry about getting marked on their drama skills and can adapt their knowledge to fit their situation without having to worry about if they are doing it “correctly.” Thus, this activity is a stress free way to help further their learning while getting feedback along the way.

3.2       the ability to use a wide variety of responsive instructional strategies and methodologies to accommodate learning styles of individual learners and support their growth as social, intellectual, physical and spiritual beings– By teaching interviewing skills using drama activities rather than English worksheets for example.

4.1       knowledge of Saskatchewan curriculum and policy documents and applies this understanding to plan lessons, units of study and year plans using curriculum outcomes as outlined by the Saskatchewan Ministry of Education– Through discussion of curricular goals and the implementation of the outcomes of both Arts (Drama) and English.

4.3       the capacity to engage in program planning to shape ‘lived curriculum’ that brings learner needs, subject matter, and contextual variables together in developmentally appropriate, culturally responsive and meaningful ways– By allowing the students to act out an interview and use this knowledge to better prepare them for their actual media interviews for the My Parks Pass contest.

Stage 2- Assessment
Assessment FOR Learning (formative) Assess the students during the learning to help determine next steps. 

This lesson is being used as a type of formative assessment for their teacher Mr. Smela to have a fun way to introduce the topic of interviews to the class and assess their comfort level, speaking ability, and ability to think on their feet. Students are gaining confidence in an interview setting and are working on their ability to improvise if they are caught off-guard.

 

Assessment OF Learning (summative) Assess the students after learning to evaluate what they have learned.

The end goal is to have the students do a formal interview. Currently, their vocabulary is lacking and they do not have the confidence or skills necessary to succeed within an interview. Thus, this drama activity is being used as an interesting/ fun way to give the students experience in an interview setting and work on skills such as directing conversation so that they are successful in their “real-life” interviews.

Stage 3- Learning Plan

 

Motivational/Anticipatory Set (introducing topic while engaging the students) (15 Mins)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9nBBgD0q6rA

-Gives the rules and a great example of how to play the game (6 mins)

-As students are watching they will be writing down 5 different words on a sheet of ripped paper and they will put it into a bag that will be drawn from as we go through people (2 mins)

-Get a student to come up and do one with me (5 mins)

Main Procedures/Strategies: (30 mins) (2 mins to get into groups and started)

-Students break off into three groups with the teachers/ adults being the interviewers. Each student gets about 5 minutes (max) to try and integrate all 5 random words into the casual conversation.

-Continue doing this throughout class with the teachers doing it to start, then helping the students, and, finally, let them do it themselves (Gradual Release of Responsibility). 6-5 minute sessions per 3 interviewers. (time can be less but no more).

-Let them know they have to have fun with it. Show some personality. People don’t want to watch sticks. Our bodies and faces can be animated for a reason.

-For Interviewers- Context-

My Parks Pass

What are some of your hobbies?

What are your plans for Easter/ Summer Holidays/ other event?

Tell me about yourself?

 

Possible word examples:

Bop It, cookie cutters, breath mint, red crayon, teddy bear, Donald Trump, Mr. Magoo, Dungeons and Dragons, vanilla scented candles, spork, Winnie the Pooh, paperclips, cardboard boxes, puppets

 

Adaptations/Differentiation:

-Easier word selection is possible

-Words can be related so the conversation isn’t massively erratic

-3 words instead of 5

-Inclusion of technology

 

Closing of lesson: (10 mins)

Does role play help prepare you for real life scenarios? If so, How? If not, why not?

What did you like/ dislike about role playing?

Has this helped ease some anxiety towards interview settings?

Closing of lesson: (approx. 10 Mins)

– Identify and discuss the importance of focus to successful drama work.

– Explain how drama work helps to develop a deeper understanding of communication and interdependence. (Clarity, Focus, Intentions) (Could you do this exercise by yourself?)

-How does this lesson apply to your English Class?

-How did your use of descriptive language enhance your ability to form a clearer mental picture of the character your classmates were creating?

 

 

M. Wilkinson ’16 *Adapted from Understanding by Design (McTighe and Wiggins, 1998)

 

Word Sneak- See video for example

  1. Students are arranged facing one another in an interview-like setting with a whiteboard/ piece of paper/ipad/etcc… behind each of the students backs (so that the students cannot see the other students words)
  2. 5 random words are assigned to each student that they must integrate into conversation as casually as possible.
  3. Students begin an interview/conversation and try and use the words in descending order giving each person a turn to try and integrate one word before passing the conversation to the other student.

My KWL Chart

KWL Chart (with summarization section)

Thoughts Organizer:

Name: ____________________­___________         Class/Grade: ___________________________

Summarize:

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

What I learned:

1.

 

2.

 

3.

 

4.

 

5.

 

6.

What I want to know:

1.

 

2.

 

3.

 

4.

 

5.

 

6.

What I already know:

1.

 

2.

 

3.

 

4.

 

5.

 

6.

 

­­

I checked-

Before reading:                □  Headings and subheadings        

                                               □  Italic, bold, and underlined word

                                                □  Pictures, tables, and graphs

                                                 □  Questions or other key information

 

After previewing:            □  Made Predictions

 

After reading:                    □  Discussed with a partner            

                                                □  Reviewed Predictions

                                                □  Rechecked all points from before reading

Three Day Road- Technology Inclusion Lesson Plan

Lesson Plan Title: What Do We Learn From Treaties?                                                            

Date: Undetermined               Subject: ELA/ History/ Social Studies           Grade:  10       Topic: Three Day Road            Time: 1 class

Materials: Pen, Paper, Electronic Resources, Phones

Stage 1- Desired Results – you may use student friendly language
What do they need to understand, know, and/or able to do?

– The importance of looking to the past to better our future.

-The importance of the Treaties to all members of society.

-The importance of fulfilling Treaty promises to foster better brother-to-brother relationships between all members of society and the world as a whole.

 

Broad Areas of Learning:

Developing Lifelong Learners-

Students who are engaged in constructing and applying English language arts knowledge naturally build a positive disposition towards learning. Throughout their study of English language arts, students gain understandings, skills, and strategies to become more competent and confident language users.

 

Developing a Sense of Self and Community-

To learn English language arts, students need not only to use the English language but also to interact with each other. They use language to interact and to respond effectively with others and to build community.

 

Cross-Curricular Competencies:

Developing Thinking-

Learners construct knowledge to make sense of the world around them. They develop understanding by building on what is already known. This key competency concerns the ability to make sense of information, experiences, and ideas through thinking contextually,

critically, and creatively. The philosophy of learning in English language arts is inquiry-based, and students use their language and thinking skills to explore a range of topics, issues, and themes

Developing Identity and Interdependence-

The ability to act autonomously in an interdependent world requires an awareness of the natural environment, of social and cultural expectations, and of the possibilities for individual and group accomplishments. English Language Arts require students to explore ideas and issues of identity, social responsibility, diversity, sustainability, and personal agency.

Developing Literacies-

Literacies provide many ways, including the use of various language systems and media, to interpret the world and express understanding of it. Literacies involve the evolution of interrelated skills, strategies, and understandings that facilitate an individual’s ability to participate fully and equitably in a variety of roles and contexts – school, home, and local and global communities. To achieve this competency requires developing skills, strategies, and understandings related to various literacies in order to explore and interpret the world and communicate meaning. English language arts requires students to use different literacies, including language literacy, effectively and contextually to represent ideas and understanding in multiple, flexible ways.

Developing Social Responsibility-

This project requires the ability to participate with others in accomplishing shared or common goals. This competency is achieved through using moral reasoning processes, engaging in communitarian thinking and dialogue, and taking action to contribute to learners’ physical, social, and cultural environments. In English language arts, students explore their social responsibility and work toward common goals to improve the lives of others and the natural and constructed worlds.

 

Outcome(s):

CR A10.1-

Comprehend and respond to a variety of visual, oral, print, and multimedia texts that address:

• identity (e.g., Foundational Stories);

• social responsibility (e.g., Destiny and Challenges of Life);

• social action (agency) (e.g., Human Existence).

– View, listen to, read, and respond to First Nations and Métis resources and other texts that reflect diverse personal identities, worldviews, and backgrounds (e.g., appearance, culture, socioeconomic status, ability, age, gender, language, social structures, and decision making).

– Identify connections between self, texts, and culture.

– Develop understanding and interpretations of a variety of texts by drawing upon personal experiences and prior knowledge of texts and language.

– Respond thoughtfully and critically to text providing support from text to justify response.

CR A10.4-

Read, interpret, and draw conclusions about the ideas, information, concepts, and themes presented in a variety of literary (including poems, plays, essays, short stories, novels) and informational (including magazines, newspapers, and on-line information) texts

-Read, comprehend, and explain the human experiences and values reflected in various literary and informational texts created by First Nations, Métis, Saskatchewan, Canadian, and international authors from various cultural communities.

– Demonstrate active reading behaviours including:

• establishing a purpose for reading such as to learn, interpret, and enjoy

• skimming, scanning, and reading closely

• identifying and analyzing explicit and implicit messages, viewpoints, and concepts

• relating understanding of a range of texts to personal experiences, purposes, audiences, and other texts

• constructing images based on text descriptions (Key)

• discussing and analyzing meanings, ideas, language, and literary and informational quality in a range of contemporary and historical texts

CC A10.1

Compose and create a range of visual, multimedia, oral, and written texts that explore:

• identity (e.g., Foundational Stories);

• social responsibility (e.g., Destiny and Challenges of Life);

• social action (agency) (e.g., Human Existence).

-Create spoken, written, and other representations that include:

•        coherence, logical progression, and support for ideas

•        clear patterns of organization

-organize information using appropriate forms (e.g., charts, diagrams, outlines, electronic databases, storyboards)

-draw logical conclusion from information and consider how to best present to identified audience

CC A10.2

Explain and present to a familiar audience the key ideas and events (actual or based on a text studied) through an appropriate combination of charts, diagrams, sound, models, drama, and print.

-Use props, visual aids, graphics, and electronic media to enhance the appeal and accuracy of presentations.

-Analyze, organize, and convert information into different forms (e.g., charts, graphs, drawings).

 

PGP Goals:

1.2       ethical behaviour and the ability to work in a collaborative manner for the good of all learners– Students are put into groups in which they need to work in a collaborative environment. In this way, students that may struggle have a support system that they can use to increase their learning. The inclusion of technology in the classroom helps to bolster student engagement and learning and helps almost all learners succeed.

1.3       a commitment to social justice and the capacity to nurture an inclusive and equitable environment for the empowerment of all learners–  It is important to recognize injustices and failed promises throughout history such as this. The first step to reconciliation is to admit to the mistake and fulfill treaty promises to foster healing between the relationships of all members of society.

2.1       knowledge of Canadian History, especially in reference to Saskatchewan and Western Canada– This lesson is based upon history in relation to Saskatchewan as well as Canada as a whole.

2.3       knowledge of First Nations, Metis and Inuit Culture and History (e.g., Treaties, Residential School, Scrip, and Worldview)- Three Day Road is written by an Aboriginal author and contains FNMI content. Therefore, knowledge of FNMI content is necessary to adequately interpret the picture stories. This lesson is specifically about treaties and the way they affect all members of society.

2.4       ability to use technologies readily, strategically and appropriately– Use of electronic resources such as Padlet, Kahoot, and todaysmeet.com help everyone within the classroom learn and provide a resource for students to look back to.

3.2       the ability to use a wide variety of responsive instructional strategies and methodologies to accommodate learning styles of individual learners and support their growth as social, intellectual, physical and spiritual beings– Use of group work and technology helps to accommodate all learners and, furthermore, helps to ensure the success of all members of the classroom.

 4.2      the ability to incorporate First Nations, Metis, and Inuit knowledge, content and perspective into all teaching areas- FNMI content is in both the book that is being studied as well as the students responses to this content. Furthermore, FNMI knowledge is important in adequately interpreting the treaty lesson.

Stage 2- Assessment
Assessment FOR Learning (formative) Assess the students during the learning to help determine next steps.

The Kahoot/ PowerPoint (depending on school situation) presentation in which we discuss Treaty Trivia is a front loading activity that allows me to see the amount of knowledge my students have in this area. This information allows me to adapt as necessary. In this way, we use something other than the KWL chart to establish what students know beforehand and what they want out know once this activity has been finished. Furthermore, the Kahoot provides a visual for students to see where they as well as their peers are at which can lead to self-assessment and reflection (while boosting self-efficacy if correct and showing that they are not the only ones if incorrect).

Additionally, technology will be used in discussions that can provide instantaneous feedback on student understanding, comprehension, and engagement. These online materials can also be referred back to by both student and teacher and provide additional formative assessment to the verbal discussions.

Question handouts from the Treaty Essential Learning- We Are All Treaty People could be handed out as well in coordination with the readings from this handbook if needed and would serve as another form of formative assessment for the teacher to assess understanding.

Assessment OF Learning (summative) Assess the students after learning to evaluate what they have learned.

This is the middle of the unit on Aboriginal Perspectives. This lesson is leading up to the Eye Witness Account/ Report Assignment as well as the oral presentation. Thus, students create a presentation from their “eye witness” account writing. Students create a picture journey (see picture story assignment) for the students to follow as they tell their story (visual stimuli). This lesson factors into this assignment by looking at the 5 W’s and H that will be the basis for the completion of this mini-unit wrap up assignment.

Who- All members of society with specific looks into Aboriginal culture and perspectives. The characters within Three Day Road.

What- The Aboriginals interaction with the British Crown in signing treaties. The significance of the treaties. What we can learn from the treaties.

Where- Mainly Canada (more specifically Saskatchewan) but the States and world could be touched on as well.

When- From first contact to today.

Why- because it is important to look at historical contexts to better understand ourselves and the society/ environment around us.  …because it allows us to see the historical interactions that influenced the characters within the novel.

How- do treaties help all members of society?  …do we move forward by recognizing the past?

This lesson is the precursor to the Residential Schools series of lessons.

Stage 3- Learning Plan- Motivational/Anticipatory Set

-Begin with an acknowledgement of this being Treaty 6 territory to show students that this land was lived upon before settlers arrived. This will help foster recognition and, thus, a start to reconciliation.

-Begin with a Kahoot/ PowerPoint slides of Treaty Trivia (See Treaty Trivia Sheet) (Kahoot if there is access to tech/ phones within the class. If not, PowerPoint will work)

– Discussion- Do Treaty relations affect all people? If so, How? If not, why do you think so? Create a Padlet/ todaysmeet.com so that students can all comment in real time as well as respond to their peers comments that are on Padlet/ todaysmeet.com in front of them. (Students can then look back on everything that has been said and make any notes etc… out of the comments).

Main Procedures/Strategies:

– Treaty Relations- Overview of the treaties that were signed within Canada with heavier emphasis on the Saskatchewan treaties. Looking at the promises and failed follow through. (Historical Contexts)

– How does the understanding of Treaties enhance or alter our understanding of the play?

– How do lessons learnt from the Treaties tie into the study of this novel? Treaty Essential Learnings –Brother-to-brother relations, Historical Context, Contemporary issues, etc.)

Treaty Essential Learnings- We Are All Treaty People– Pages 15-17- The Treaty Relationship, Pages 18-25 Historical Context

Adaptations/Differentiation:

-Technology inclusion within the discussions for those to reserved to speak to the group as well as for typing/ taking notes

-Notes put on todaysmeet.com can be chosen to last for certain periods of time. Thus, students can access this material outside of class which can help them remember discussion points as well as create notes based on peer input and knowledge.

-The use of online sites such as Padlet/ todaysmeet.com allow for quiet addition while speakers talk which eliminates the need to interrupt.

Closing of lesson:

–          Using Padlet/todaysmeet.com, have students pin their recollected thoughts about worldviews from a previous lesson (Pg. 26-47 of Treaty Essential Learnings- We Are All Treaty People handbook- prior lesson)

–          Using students previous knowledge of worldviews as well as todays lessons on treaties, analyze and discuss the impact that Canadian Treaties could have if implemented on a global scale in small groups. Have students pin their thoughts/ ideas on either Padlet/ todaysmeet.com again for all groups to see.

–          Have a quick discussion on the effectiveness of each group’s ideas/ thoughts.

 

 

 

M. Wilkinson ’16 *Adapted from Understanding by Design (McTighe and Wiggins, 1998)

Three Day Road- Culturally Responsive Lesson Plan

Lesson Plan Title: Residential Schools                                                                                  

Date: Undetermined               Subject: ELA/ Social Studies            Grade:  10       Topic: Three Day Road/ Residential Schools

Time: 3 classes

Materials: Pen, Paper, Ears

Stage 1- Desired Results – you may use student friendly language
What do they need to understand, know, and/or able to do?

– Residential school was developed to try to teach First Nation’s children to leave their cultural ways for that of the newcomers.

-Residential school was extremely difficult for First Nation’s children because they had to leave their families and communities for extended periods to go away to school and experienced horrible conditions within the schools including physical, mental, emotional, and sexual abuse.

-Residential school affects First Nations people today because of the ongoing intergenerational trauma that was a direct result of the conditions and abuses endured by the First Nations people

-All Canadians can help the healing process by learning about and understanding the truths about the history and legacy of Indian Residential Schools

-Stories are a powerful device of healing, persuasion, information, and engagement

 

Broad Areas of Learning:

Developing Lifelong Learners-

Students who are engaged in constructing and applying English language arts knowledge naturally build a positive disposition towards learning. Throughout their study of English language arts, students gain understandings, skills, and strategies to become more competent and confident language users.

 

Developing a Sense of Self and Community-

To learn English language arts, students need not only to use the English language but also to interact with each other. They use language to interact and to respond effectively with others and to build community.

 

Engaged Citizens-

In the English language arts, students learn how language enables them to make a difference in their personal, peer, family, and community lives. Language gives them a sense of agency and an ability to make a difference in their community and the world in which they live.

 

Cross-Curricular Competencies:

Developing Thinking-

Learners construct knowledge to make sense of the world around them. They develop understanding by building on what is already known. This key competency concerns the ability to make sense of information, experiences, and ideas through thinking contextually,

critically, and creatively. The philosophy of learning in English language arts is inquiry-based, and students use their language and thinking skills to explore a range of topics, issues, and themes

Developing Identity and Interdependence-

The ability to act autonomously in an interdependent world requires an awareness of the natural environment, of social and cultural expectations, and of the possibilities for individual and group accomplishments. English Language Arts require students to explore ideas and issues of identity, social responsibility, diversity, sustainability, and personal agency.

Developing Literacies-

Literacies provide many ways, including the use of various language systems and media, to interpret the world and express understanding of it. Literacies involve the evolution of interrelated skills, strategies, and understandings that facilitate an individual’s ability to participate fully and equitably in a variety of roles and contexts – school, home, and local and global communities. To achieve this competency requires developing skills, strategies, and understandings related to various literacies in order to explore and interpret the world and communicate meaning. English language arts requires students to use different literacies, including language literacy, effectively and contextually to represent ideas and understanding in multiple, flexible ways.

Developing Social Responsibility-

This project requires the ability to participate with others in accomplishing shared or common goals. This competency is achieved through using moral reasoning processes, engaging in communitarian thinking and dialogue, and taking action to contribute to learners’ physical, social, and cultural environments. In English language arts, students explore their social responsibility and work toward common goals to improve the lives of others and the natural and constructed worlds.

 

Outcome(s):

CR A10.1-

Comprehend and respond to a variety of visual, oral, print, and multimedia texts that address:

• identity (e.g., Foundational Stories);

• social responsibility (e.g., Destiny and Challenges of Life);

• social action (agency) (e.g., Human Existence).

– View, listen to, read, and respond to First Nations and Métis resources and other texts that reflect diverse personal identities, worldviews, and backgrounds (e.g., appearance, culture, socioeconomic status, ability, age, gender, language, social structures, and decision making).

– Identify connections between self, texts, and culture.

– Develop understanding and interpretations of a variety of texts by drawing upon personal experiences and prior knowledge of texts and language.

– Respond thoughtfully and critically to text providing support from text to justify response.

CR A10.4-

Read, interpret, and draw conclusions about the ideas, information, concepts, and themes presented in a variety of literary (including poems, plays, essays, short stories, novels) and informational (including magazines, newspapers, and on-line information) texts

-Read, comprehend, and explain the human experiences and values reflected in various literary and informational texts created by First Nations, Métis, Saskatchewan, Canadian, and international authors from various cultural communities.

– Demonstrate active reading behaviours including:

• establishing a purpose for reading such as to learn, interpret, and enjoy

• skimming, scanning, and reading closely

• identifying and analyzing explicit and implicit messages, viewpoints, and concepts

• relating understanding of a range of texts to personal experiences, purposes, audiences, and other texts

• constructing images based on text descriptions (Key)

• discussing and analyzing meanings, ideas, language, and literary and informational quality in a range of contemporary and historical texts

CC A10.1

Compose and create a range of visual, multimedia, oral, and written texts that explore:

• identity (e.g., Foundational Stories);

• social responsibility (e.g., Destiny and Challenges of Life);

• social action (agency) (e.g., Human Existence).

-Create spoken, written, and other representations that include:

•        coherence, logical progression, and support for ideas

•        clear patterns of organization

-organize information using appropriate forms (e.g., charts, diagrams, outlines, electronic databases, storyboards)

-draw logical conclusion from information and consider how to best present to identified audience

CC A10.2

Explain and present to a familiar audience the key ideas and events (actual or based on a text studied) through an appropriate combination of charts, diagrams, sound, models, drama, and print.

-Use props, visual aids, graphics, and electronic media to enhance the appeal and accuracy of presentations.

-Analyze, organize, and convert information into different forms (e.g., charts, graphs, drawings).

 

PGP Goals:

1.2       ethical behaviour and the ability to work in a collaborative manner for the good of all learners– Students are put into groups in which they need to work in a collaborative environment. In this way, students that may struggle have a support system that they can use to increase their learning and comfort.

1.3       a commitment to social justice and the capacity to nurture an inclusive and equitable environment for the empowerment of all learners–  It is important to recognize injustices throughout history such as this. The first step to reconciliation is to admit to the mistake and recognize the merit of legitimizing the survivor’s stories so that the truth can help future generations and foster healing between the relationships of all members of society.

2.1       knowledge of Canadian History, especially in reference to Saskatchewan and Western Canada- This lesson is based upon history in relation to Saskatchewan as well as Canada as a whole.

2.3       knowledge of First Nations, Metis and Inuit Culture and History (e.g., Treaties, Residential School, Scrip, and Worldview)- Three Day Road is written by an Aboriginal author and contains FNMI content. Therefore, knowledge of FNMI content is essential to both the novel as well as the lesson material (residential schools). This is a direct inclusion of FNMI content.

2.4       ability to use technologies readily, strategically and appropriately– Use of electronic resources such as YouTube to show differing perspectives to my own allows students to see the breadth of the effects of residential schools on the Aboriginal peoples. It also allows a more intimate view by showing real survivor stories that I simply do not have.

3.2       the ability to use a wide variety of responsive instructional strategies and methodologies to accommodate learning styles of individual learners and support their growth as social, intellectual, physical and spiritual beings– Use of group work as well as the Jigsaw Teaching strategy helps to accommodate all learners and, furthermore, helps to ensure the success of all members of the classroom.

 4.2      the ability to incorporate First Nations, Metis, and Inuit knowledge, content and perspective into all teaching areas- FNMI content is in both the book that is being studied as well as the students responses to this content. Furthermore, FNMI knowledge is important in adequately interpreting and recognizing the truth behind the residential school stories.

4.3       the capacity to engage in program planning to shape ‘lived curriculum’ that brings learner needs, subject matter, and contextual variables together in developmentally appropriate, culturally responsive and meaningful ways- The inclusion of the speaker allows the students to see that this has more effect than simply within stories. This emotional connection with the speaker makes the students “live the curriculum” and work towards reconciliation as well as decolonization. In this way, the students take what they are learning from this unit and apply it to their everyday life becoming more active and engaged citizens within both their local and global communities.

Stage 2- Assessment
Assessment FOR Learning (formative) Assess the students during the learning to help determine next steps. 

KWL charts to track students prior knowledge as well as the knowledge they gain from the lesson. Journal entries (as a continuation of the reading journal) in the same style as the students did during the reading of Three Day Road

-1 or 2 quotes that are important (to the chapter, book, characters, or reader) and an explanation of its importance (sentence or point form).

-Paragraph about the readers thoughts, connections, and reactions to the videos (Rosenblatt’s The Reader, The Text, The Poem- What do the words on the page do in the mind of the reader)

-(Minimum 10) Point form notes on what the reader has learnt about the characters, setting, time period, major events, etc… throughout all videos altogether (not 10 per video)

Assessment OF Learning (summative) Assess the students after learning to evaluate what they have learned.

This lesson is building to the Eye Witness Account/ report that answers the 5W’s and H for facts about what happened and uses descriptive details and then the presentation of these writings orally to the class as a “story.”

-Oral and symbolic tradition- mini-unit wrap up. Students present their personalized story orally to the class (or, if a student is reticent about this activity, with the teacher outside of class time) touching on the above details. Thus, students create a presentation from their “eye witness” account writing. (The Elder would have used descriptive details in his/her account of the events and, thus, is the scaffold of this project). Students create a picture journey (see picture story assignment) for the students to follow as they tell their story (visual stimuli).

Marking will be based upon: coherence, accuracy, understanding (of audience and material discussed), and detail. The extent of which will be co-created with my students and, thus, a rubric will be created based upon these topics linked into the outcomes and indicators within the curriculum.

Stage 3- Learning Plan- Motivational/Anticipatory Set

-KWL chart on Residential schools- what they know, what they want to know, and (at the end of class) what they learnt- I personally like KWL charts because they give a concrete understanding for both student and teacher about where the students are at and the knowledge that they are bringing into the classroom. Furthermore, KWL charts provide a running record of student learning and insights as they are used throughout the unit. (I am hoping that by the time they are in grade 10 they would have touched or, in detail, covered residential schools and their impact on Canadian culture and the Aboriginal peoples themselves) Depending on the responses from the students, my instruction can be adapted to include a more in depth analysis of Residential school impact.

-The videos can also be considered engaging materials as well.

-A quick precursor that this material can be uncomfortable but is still very important would be beneficial to all students as well as the recognition that this is Treaty 6 territory.

Main Procedures/Strategies:

  1. 20 minutes worth of video content looking at the Residential schools themselves as well as their impact. I am showing the students these videos because I am not the authority on this knowledge. I want them to learn from those that can provide for them the context and real life experiences (the truth) that I can only touch on especially because of my inclusion in the dominant culture. Acknowledging this fact is important to show that these are not my stories but that I support the people whose stories they are.

It Matters: The Legacy of Residential School by The WSO Canada (YouTube).- (Approx. 5 mins) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rxGtnKUT0ms

-This resource is a quick blurb about residential schools from another perspective rather than simply “white.” It also looks at the persecution of the Sikh people as well and what they think about the residential schools as well. These resource looks at two stories of oppression and shows that this is not an isolated incident and we need to be better.

– The Impact of Residential Schools on Aboriginal Healthcare | Dawn Tisdale | TEDxComoxValley- (Approx. 10 mins needed) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kMvn_mSsykE

-Ted talks are an excellent resource. This talk looks at a more personalized account of learning about residential school. This will connect with the students because they will be learning about residential schools in the same way as this young woman. Good use of storytelling to get a point across.

Heritage Minutes: Chanie Wenjack-(1 minute)- Written by Joseph Boyden https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v_tcCpKtoU0

New Heritage Minute explores dark history of residential schools-(approx. 2 and a half minutes)  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TK483UHGd7k

-These two resources give a quick glimpse into residential school life and are fairly hard hitting. They take a peek into another residential school survivor’s stories.

2a. 15 minute Discussion-

Why did we watch these videos?

What emotions do these videos foster? Why?

How have the relationships between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people in Canada been broken?

2b. 10 mins- Break into groups of 3 or 4 and then come together to share answers to the class (jigsaw method). Each student has to write in their journal about their group’s discussion. Each group gets a question with a change to discuss before and after the speaker.

How do the stories we have just viewed apply to Three Day Road? What are the similarities? Differences?

How do these stories apply to us as individuals? A class? A society? How have Canadians been denied a proper education about First Nations societies and their historical relationships with Canadians?

How do these stories apply to reconciliation? What is reconciliation? What positive actions can be taken to bring about reconciliation?

-This lesson is a precursor to the Elder talk. I believe that going through this lesson will allow the students a better background to what the Elder is saying and will provide context for the students. Hearing the personalized account of the Residential school will (most likely) foster heavy emotions and this has to be told to the students beforehand.

Day 2-

I would like to make this a place-based lesson and have the kids go listen to an Elder at Wanuskewin Heritage Park or another outside area. In this way, it gets them out of the classroom and more connected to the land and the stories that come from it. This, in my opinion, would be very powerful sitting behind the school with the school in the backdrop. Students would still be outside but in full view of the type of institutions that the Elder/ stories are talking about.

The important thing here is the connection between the learning and listening in connection with the land. This sort of “roots” the learning into the students and gives them a better connection and understanding of the stories we have listened to throughout this mini-unit as they begin to understand how a people that were in connection with the land were ripped from it.

1.      Talk by an Elder (approx. 30 mins). Leading with the presentation of tobacco and the asking if they will share their knowledge with the students on their experiences with Residential Schools. Thanking of the Elder.

2.      Discussion on what the students learnt from the Elder. How does this apply to the questions you are discussing from last class?

3.      Journal entries about what they experienced in the Elder talk (using the same journal format as laid out in the formative assessment section) (approx. 10 mins). I also want the students to write about the 5 W’s and H (Who, What, Where, When, Why, and How) from the Elders talk in preparation for the personalized Eye Witness Account/ report.

Day 3-

1.      10 minutes to discuss any changes the students need to make within their presentation- Group presentations approximately 10 mins each (depending on the amount of groups)

2.      See Closing.

Adaptations/Differentiation:

-Guest Speaker

-Flexible timeframes

-Possible place-based education and/ or field trip opportunity (out of desk/ conventional classroom) Ex. Wanuskewin Heritage Park, Brightwater, the parks and/ or trails along the river that are part of the Meewasin Valley Authority.

-See Unit Adaptations and Differentiation

Closing of lesson: (Last class) (Each day has a mini closing throughout the plan)

Finish KWL chart about what the students have learnt as well as how this ties into the wrap-up project. Use the rest of the time to write in journals.

Final Revised Three Day Road Unit Plan

Capture

Elijah’s Decent into the Wendigo (Alternate spelling Windigo).

“We all fight on two fronts, the one facing the enemy, the one facing what we do to the enemy” (Pg. 326)

Three Day Road picture story creation.

 

Title of Unit

A Journey through Three Day Road by Joseph Boyden  

Grade Level

Grade 10
 

Subject

English Language Arts (ELA)  

Time Frame

Approx. 3 months (the last week being the final project)
 

Developed By

Kashtin Moen
 
Stage 1 – Identify Desired Results

 

Broad Areas of Learning

How are the BAL incorporated into this unit?

 

Lifelong Learners-

Students who are engaged in constructing and applying ELA knowledge naturally build a positive disposition towards learning. Throughout their study of English language arts, students gain understandings, skills, and strategies to become more competent and confident language users.

-This unit will challenge students to incorporate prior knowledge with learned knowledge to fully interact and learn from Joseph Boyden’s Three Day Road. Students will continually be working on improving their ELA skills in reading, writing, and speaking while developing new and implementing old learning strategies. This unit will attempt to unlock and/ or enhance skills the students can carry into their futures in regards to the plethora of knowledge that is contained within stories.

Sense of Self, Community, and Place-

To learn English language arts, students need not only to use the English language but also to interact with each other. Through the English language arts, students learn about themselves, others, and the world. The students use language to define who they are and to explore who they might become. They use language to interact and to respond effectively with others and to build community.

-This unit has many opportunities for students to work individually, in groups, and as part of a team to create a positive learning environment within the classroom. Thus, teamwork and cooperation are some of the backbones of this unit. It is important for students to develop skills in these areas as these skills are highly transferable to everyday situations from work to extracurricular activities. This unit also gives them a peek into Canadian history and Aboriginal ways of knowing while developing their sense of community, mutual respect, and place within a greater context.

Engaged Citizens-

In the English language arts, students learn how language enables them to make a difference in their personal, peer, family, and community lives. Language gives them a sense of agency and an ability to make a difference in their community and the world in which they live.

-This unit will foster interpersonal relationships that translate into constructing positive social interactions within everyday life. Students will learn about a multitude of topics that will give them the confidence in themselves to show intellectual courage and mutual respect in their own lives and communities.

Cross curricular Competencies

How will this unit promote the CCC?

 

Developing Thinking (DT)-

Learners construct knowledge to make sense of the world around them. They develop understanding by building on what is already known. This key competency concerns the ability to make sense of information, experiences, and ideas through thinking contextually, critically, and creatively. The philosophy of learning in English language arts is inquiry-based, and students use their language and thinking skills to explore a range of topics, issues, and themes.

-This unit has plenty of opportunities for students to bring prior knowledge into their work as well as discussions. They have to apply their knowledge to make sense of the ways in which the novel connects to themselves and their world around them. The plethora of different assignments allows students to show off their skills in a number of different ways. Thinking critically, students must analyze the novel and its components and apply it to the unit material. Thinking creatively, students can apply creative solutions to the problems presented within the unit and show their learning in a creative manner. Thinking contextually, students can apply their prior knowledge to situations that arise from the reading material or the discussions and construct answers based upon their “out of classroom” learning. In this way, the unit will foster “real-life” out of classroom learning through actively engaging the students and making them want to learn more about the topics that are being discussed. By asking inquiry-based questions, the students learn to construct an answer on their own by working through the question using all the knowledge in which they have and thinking contextually, critically, and creatively.

Developing Identity and Interdependence (DII)-

The ability to act autonomously in an interdependent world requires an awareness of the natural environment, of social and cultural expectations, and of the possibilities for individual and group accomplishments. It assumes the possession of a positive self-concept and the ability to live in harmony with others and with the natural and constructed worlds. Achieving this competency requires understanding, valuing, and caring for oneself; understanding, valuing, and respecting human diversity and human rights and responsibilities; and understanding and valuing social and environmental interdependence and sustainability. English language arts require students to explore ideas and issues of identity, social responsibility, diversity, sustainability, and personal agency.

-This unit has a whole subsection devoted to the study of identity both within the novel as well as within the individuals studying the novel. In this way, comparisons can be drawn and a deeper understanding of one’s own identity can emerge. This unit also focuses on group work in order to foster interdependence and teamwork to work towards a shared goal of learning and understanding. Through the knowledge gained about oneself within this unit, students can work towards establishing compassion for other members of their community and world and be part of a positive change in our world. This is especially important at a time when hate is so prevalent within our lives through media coverage and violence towards “other” ethnicities.

Developing Literacies (DL)-

Literacies provide many ways, including the use of various language systems and media, to interpret the world and express understanding of it. Literacies involve the evolution of interrelated skills, strategies, and understandings that facilitate an individual’s ability to participate fully and equitably in a variety of roles and contexts – school, home, and local and global communities. To achieve this competency requires developing skills, strategies, and understandings related to various literacies in order to explore and interpret the world and communicate meaning. English language arts requires students to use different literacies, including language literacy, effectively and contextually to represent ideas and understanding in multiple, flexible ways.

This unit looks to develop a range of literacies in order to support and challenge all learners. Reading skills such as skimming vs reading in depth will be looked at to foster different strategies for students to succeed. Communication is an essential tool of humankind and, thus, different strategies to foster communication and communication skill acquisition will be implemented. Literacies involving writing will be explored in depth throughout unit work with different writing methods (essay, poem, monologues, etc…) being used to give the students a comprehensive knowledge of different writing forms.

Developing Social Responsibility (DSR)-

Social responsibility is how people positively contribute to their physical, social, and cultural environments. It requires the ability to participate with others in accomplishing shared or common goals. This competency is achieved through using moral reasoning processes, engaging in communitarian thinking and dialogue, and taking action to contribute to learners’ physical, social, and cultural environments. In English language arts, students explore their social responsibility and work toward common goals to improve the lives of others and the natural and constructed worlds.

-The group work within this unit will require students to positively contribute to their “team” and foster a positive learning environment for all learners. The groups are working towards a common goal of learning and have the ability to take their own learning into their own hands. This unit requires a lot of discussion / communication with a plethora of different sized groups in order to foster positive communication and idea generation. These skills are highly transferable into “real life” scenarios in which students would be facing on a day to day basis because communication has a large influence in our everyday lives. Furthermore, the communication skills gained from active participation within this unit can help students in future endeavors whether that is simply getting a job or being an active spokesperson for environmental issues.

 

Learning Outcomes

What relevant goals will this unit address?

(must come from curriculum; include the designations e.g. IN2.1)

 

I feel as though these outcomes are designed to fit throughout each and every aspect of my unit as a whole. Thus, upon further reflection, I do not believe that I need to designate or limit them to specific sections because of their presence throughout the unit.

 

CR A10.1

Comprehend and respond to a variety of visual, oral, print, and multimedia texts that address:

• identity (e.g., Foundational Stories);

• social responsibility (e.g., Destiny and Challenges of Life);

• social action (agency) (e.g., Human Existence).

– View, listen to, read, and respond to First Nations and Métis resources and other texts that reflect diverse personal identities, worldviews, and backgrounds (e.g., appearance, culture, socioeconomic status, ability, age, gender, language, social structures, and decision making).

– Identify connections between self, texts, and culture

– Respond personally and critically to individuals, events, and ideas presented in a variety of First Nations, Métis, and other Canadian and international texts.

CR A10.3

Listen to, interpret, summarize, and draw conclusions about the ideas and information presented in a variety of literary and informational texts including group discussions, oral readings, interviews, and prepared talks about a topic being studied.

– Listen to and interpret grade-appropriate literary and informational texts created by First Nations, Métis, Saskatchewan, Canadian, and international authors from various cultural communities.

– Engage in reflective, critical, empathic, and appreciative listening.

– Identify the language features and their effects in a range of oral and multimedia texts and describe and analyze their relationships to meaning, purpose, and audience

– Listen respectfully to an invited guest with expertise on the subject, and make notes on the key points as well as the speaker’s purpose, attitude, and organization of ideas for effect.

CR A10.4

Read, interpret, and draw conclusions about the ideas, information, concepts, and themes presented in a variety of literary (including poems, plays, essays, short stories, novels) and informational (including magazines, newspapers, and on-line information) texts

– Read, comprehend, and explain the human experiences and values reflected in various literary and informational texts created by First Nations, Métis, Saskatchewan, Canadian, and international authors from various cultural communities

– Read and interpret critically the main ideas, events, and themes of a variety of literary texts including stories, novels, scripts, poetry, and non-fiction works, and prepare, present, and defend critical responses to what is read.

– Interpret, explain, analyze, and discuss how the literary qualities and the distinctive conventions, structures, and language features of a range of texts suit the topic and purpose.

CC A10.1

Compose and create a range of visual, multimedia, oral, and written texts that explore:

• identity (e.g., Foundational Stories);

• social responsibility (e.g., Destiny and Challenges of Life);

• social action (agency) (e.g., Human Existence).

– Use representing, speaking, and writing to respond to experiences or texts (e.g., a staged dramatic scene, a television episode, a significant personal event).

– Develop and present a project-based inquiry related to a theme or topic of the course:

·      collaborate to determine group knowledge base and to define inquiry or research purpose and parameters

·      draw logical conclusion from information and consider how to best present to identified audience

·      access information using a variety of tools (e.g., electronic networks, libraries, taped oral histories)

CC A10.2

Explain and present to a familiar audience the key ideas and events (actual or based on a text studied) through an appropriate combination of charts, diagrams, sound, models, drama, and print.

– Present information using print and non-print aids to engage and inform a familiar audience.

– Use props, visual aids, graphics, and electronic media to enhance the appeal and accuracy of presentations.

– Use and adapt production techniques and technologies to communicate information, ideas, narrative, or other messages, integrating verbal, visual, and dramatic features to achieve a range of effects.

CC A10.3

Use oral language to express a range of information and ideas in formal (including a prepared talk on a familiar topic, an oral presentation of a passage of prose or poetry, retelling a narrative or recounting an experience or event) and informal (discussion and group work) situations.

– Participate in small- and large-group discussions, observing the courtesies of group discussion, and demonstrate effective group interaction skills and strategies:

·      develop harmony, listen, observe, and respond to and clarify one another’s ideas

·      be respectful but also critical

·      work co-operatively and collaboratively with others in small groups on structured tasks

·      question others, exploring the potential of their contributions, and offer clarification and elaboration upon own ideas when necessary

·      assume some of the work necessary to maintain discussion and advance it (e.g., by summarizing, raising questions, extracting significant points, making connections, setting agenda)

CC A10.4

Compose and create a variety of written literary (including a historical persona essay and a review) and informational (including an observation [eye-witness] report and researched or technical report) texts attending to various elements of discourse (e.g., purpose, speaker, audience, form).

– Write an observation report/eyewitness account (e.g., an incident report, an event report) that:

·         answers 5W and H (who, what, when, where, why, and how) questions for facts about what happened

·         includes thoughts and comments that bring experience to life

·         uses descriptive details (including sights, sounds, tastes, textures, and smells) that show the reader what happened, as if he or she were seeing it firsthand

– Write a historical persona essay (e.g., biographical narrative, response to a historical photo) that:

·         defines important moments in the historic person’s life so essay is well-focused and organized

·         shows understanding of the person, the events, and gathered details about the place and time

·         uses the “I” voice (imagined self to be the person and to be part of these events) in order to get a feel for the experience.

– Write a review (e.g., evaluating a literary work) that:

·         includes thoughtful explanations and specific references to the text itself

·         explores strengths and weaknesses of work and includes passages from text as examples

·         does not retell plot but recognizes theme (general observation about life or human nature) of the text and the relevance of literary techniques (e.g., setting, characters, point of view, basic conflicts, plot development, and use of literary elements such as figurative language and sound).

AR A10.1

Establish and apply criteria to evaluate own and others’ work

– Use feedback to evaluate own effectiveness and set goals in language learning and use

-Evaluate own and others’ contributions to group process and provide support where needed.

– Contribute to the creation of rubrics and other assessment and evaluation tools used to assess visual, oral, written, multimedia, and other products submitted.

 

Treaty Training- (Best Representations from all grade levels that fall into my unit)

Spirit and Intent of Treaties K.2

Express personal connectedness to nature and one another (e.g., Circle of Life, seasons, elements, weather, families, and relatives).

-Recognize that all people are connected to each other and to nature.

– Represent how we are part of an interconnected web (e.g., a family member, a community member, a human interconnected to all life).

– Share examples of how we experience nature in our lives (e.g., day and night, wood grain, scales on a fish, heartbeats).

 

Historical Context K.3

Explore the connection all people have to the land as expressed through stories, traditions, and ceremonies

-Discuss stories and traditions that show personal connection to the land

-Describe how people use resources from nature, now and in the past.

 

Historical Context 1.3

Explore the many ways people meet their needs from nature and the land on which they live.

– Describe various uses (e.g., food, clothing, shelter) of buffalo, elk, moose, and caribou, now and in the past.

– Compare how people, past and present, live on the land (e.g., agriculture, ranching, trapping, fishing, dwellings, and modes of transportation).

– Explain how people helped and continue to help each other live on this land.

 

Spirit and Intent of Treaties 8.2

Assess the impact residential schools have on First Nations communities

–          Compare stories of First Nations people who attended residential schools to the experiences students have had in their own schools.

–          Investigate how First Nations people were forced to learn languages and cultures other than their own.

– Represent the effects of residential schools on First Nations’ languages and cultures.

– Examine how First Nations and communities continue to deal with and heal from the abuses experienced by First Nation peoples in residential schools.

 

Treaty Relationships 10.1

Examine contemporary economic implications of Treaties for all the people of Saskatchewan and other Canadian jurisdictions.

–   Investigate the economic impact that First Nations have on the provincial and territorial economies and the resulting benefits for all people (e.g. natural resources; hunting, fishing and gathering; tourism; hospitality; gaming).

–          Evaluate the impact that First Nations have on local economies.

–          Investigate the cost of fulfilling treaties within Saskatchewan and other Canadian jurisdictions.

 

Spirit and Intent of Treaties 10.2

Analyze the spirit and intent of Treaties and investigate the extent to which they have been fulfilled.

– Identify spirit and intent of the terms of treaty.

-Imagine and describe what our society would look like today if all treaty obligations had been completely fulfilled and what it could look like into the future (e.g., Maori influence on New Zealand institutions).

 

Treaty Relationship 11.1

Examine how Canada’s process of treaty making could be applied to situations in other parts of the world where Indigenous people have struggled to have rights recognized. Indicators:

– Apply the principles of Canadian treaty making as a means for resolving conflict and represent it (e.g. dramatization, visual, dance, oral representation, multimedia presentation).

– Investigate how the United Nations addresses issues regarding the self-determination of Indigenous peoples.

 

Treaty Promises and Provisions 11.4

Analyze the impact Canadian treaties could have on resolving global conflict.

– Assess Canadian treaty making processes and compare to treaty processes from around the world.

– Assess the leadership role Canada plays internationally in treaty making.

 

 

Enduring Understandings

What understandings about the big ideas are desired? (what you want students to understand & be able to use several years from now)

What misunderstandings are predictable?

Essential Questions

What provocative questions will foster inquiry into the content? (open-ended questions that stimulate thought and inquiry linked to the content of the enduring understanding)

Students will understand that…

-Learning through listening to the stories of others can help better oneself

-What they learn through reading can be applied to better their everyday lives

-The ability to intellectually communication is a key aspect in human life

-Our character defines and determines us, yet there is always a capacity for personal growth

-That decisions have wide spread implications on not only the decision maker but on those around them and the world as a whole as well.

-Understanding of FNMI worldviews pre and post colonialism.

 

Related misconceptions…

This is only a story and we can’t learn from reading someone else’s story.

It doesn’t relate to me.

Reading books are only for an English class

Students don’t believe that what they know can apply to intellectual conversation

I do not need to care about Aboriginal issues if I’m not Aboriginal

Content specific….

-How does who we are affect what we see/ or don’t see as well as how we act? Can this be changed or altered?

– How do the values of the individual conflict or not conflict with those of the larger society as a whole?

– What makes an individual decide a course of action and how are those around them affected by those decisions?

– How does placing a piece of literature in the context of our time period affect its meaning and how it is perceived? In its own time?

– How do different worldviews effect and/or reflect throughout our society? Within this novel?

 

FNMI, multicultural, cross-curricular…

– What makes an individual decide a course of action and how are those around them affected by those decisions?

– How does the culture reflected in the writing affect your understanding of it? How does your own culture affect your understanding of it?

-How does the understanding of Treaties enhance or alter our understanding of the play

-In what ways is Three Day Road relevant to our own time and circumstances?

-How have Aboriginal issues evolved or not throughout history?

-In which ways are Indigenous worldviews represented or prevalent within our society? This novel?

Knowledge:

What knowledge will students acquire as a result of this unit?  This content knowledge may come from the indicators, or might also address pre-requisite knowledge that students will need for this unit.

 

Skills

What skills will students acquire as a result of this unit?  List the skills and/or behaviours that students will be able to exhibit as a result of their work in this unit.  These will come from the indicators.

Students will know…

Based Upon the Unit Assignments, Reflections, and Discussions:

-themselves or an increasing part of themselves

the importance of working as a group (and individually) in reaching academic and learning goals.

-different cultural values and norms and how these interact with one’s own cultural values and norms

-Canadian history- the truth and the damages associated with Residential schools.

-the truth and damages associated with the war

-How authors use literary elements to flesh out their works

-Issues that have befallen Aboriginal peoples both past and present

-How storytelling is an important knowledge keeper and is used as a way to pass on knowledge through generations.

 

Specifically Outcome and Indicator Based:

-The ability to make connections to self, society, community, and the world to stories of all peoples.

– The ability to respond personally and critically to individuals, events, and ideas presented in a variety of First Nations, Métis, and other Canadian and international texts

– The opportunity to read and interpret critically the main ideas, events, and themes of a variety of literary texts including stories, novels, scripts, poetry, and non-fiction works, and prepare, present, and defend critical responses to what is read.

-Use representing, speaking, and writing to respond to experiences or texts

-How learning about the treaties gives us a better representation of the brother-to-brother (harmonious) relationships between all individuals including the land on which we live.

– Present information using print and non-print aids to engage and inform a familiar audience.

– Use props, visual aids, graphics, and electronic media to enhance the appeal and accuracy of presentations.

– Use and adapt production techniques and technologies to communicate information, ideas, narrative, or other messages, integrating verbal, visual, and dramatic features to achieve a range of effects.

– the language features and their effects in a range of oral and multimedia texts and how to describe and analyze their relationships to meaning, purpose, and audience

– how to engage in reflective, critical, empathic, and appreciative listening

– how First Nations and communities continue to deal with and heal from the abuses experienced by First Nation peoples in residential schools

– how to interpret, explain, analyze, and discuss how the literary qualities and the distinctive conventions, structures, and language features of a range of texts suit the topic and purpose.

Students will be able to…

Based Upon the Unit Assignments, Reflections, and Discussions:

– This unit is attempting to connect and include all levels of Blooms Taxonomy using skills such as questioning, analyzing, and inference (of main ideas and characters) among others.

– Discuss the novel in a variety of manners such as Socratic circle, self-sustained small group work, think-pair-share, debate, and Jigsaw methods.

-Apply prior knowledge to learning material to bolster their own learning.

-Gain a clearer concept of what they previously understood, what they have learnt (within all parts of the unit), and what they still would like to know (based upon the KWL chart).

– Possess the language and ideas to discuss literary concepts as well as the ways in which both European and Aboriginal worldviews are prevalent within the novel

-Organize notes/research/information (from discussions, notes, journals, online and book research materials, etc…)

-Express one’s ideas clearly and in a unique manner

 

Specifically Outcome and Indicator Based:

– Write an observation report/eyewitness account

– Write a historical persona essay (e.g., biographical narrative, response to a historical photo)

– Write a review (e.g., evaluating a literary work)

– Establish and apply criteria to evaluate own and others’ work

– Use oral language to express a range of information and ideas in formal (including a prepared talk on a familiar topic, an oral presentation of a passage of prose or poetry, retelling a narrative or recounting an experience or event) and informal (discussion and group work) situations.

– Compose and create a range of visual, multimedia, oral, and written texts that explore:

• identity (e.g., Foundational Stories);

• social responsibility (e.g., Destiny and Challenges of Life);

• social action (agency) (e.g., Human Existence)

– Explain and present to a familiar audience the key ideas and events (actual or based on a text studied) through an appropriate combination of charts, diagrams, sound, models, drama, and print.

-Use oral language to express a range of information and ideas in formal (including a prepared talk on a familiar topic, an oral presentation of a passage of prose or poetry, retelling a narrative or recounting an experience or event) and informal (discussion and group work) situations.

Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence

 

Performance Task

Through what authentic performance task will students demonstrate the desired understandings, knowledge, and skills? (describes the learning activity in “story” form.  Typically, the P.T. describes a scenario or situation that requires students to apply knowledge and skills to demonstrate their understanding in a real life situation. Describe your performance task scenario below)

By what criteria will performances of understanding be judged?

GRASPS Elements of the Performance Task   
G – Goal

What should students accomplish by completing this task?

G- Discover how they have evolved as a person through the undertaking of personal journeys and overcoming obstacles within their lives. Discover how their journey is similar/ different from the characters within the novel Three Day Road.

R- This is an “I” perspective or a third person perspective “he, she, or they”

A- The reader/ consumer/ audience (Mainly teacher but there are several instances where classmates may be involved depending on the project)

S- An in depth exploration of self. How did I become the person who I am today? What has shaped my character and influenced my values and thoughts? An emotional undertaking.

P- Students will create a final project for the full unit on Three Day Road based on a journey within their own lives that they have undertaken. They can choose between a variety of options to complete this task such as creating a photo journey, create a mini play/ monologue, an essay, or they can come to me with an idea.

S- Co-created criteria is hugely important for this project because the students have to put their heart and soul into this journey delving into themselves in a way they may not have previously. Thus, in my opinion, the assessment must meet the students on their grounds to allow them to feel safe rather than “judged.” I believe that in this way the students will feel included, engaged, and safe which will result in a positive learning environment and lead to better work overall.

R – Role

What role (perspective) will your students be taking?

A – Audience

Who is the relevant audience?

 

S – Situation

The context or challenge provided to the student.

P – Product, Performance

What product/performance will the student create?

S – Standards & Criteria for Success

Create the rubric for the Performance Task

 

Attach rubric to Unit Plan- See Three Day Road Assessment Piece

 

Other Evidence

Through what other evidence (work samples, observations, quizzes, tests, journals or other means) will students demonstrate achievement of the desired results? Formative and summative assessments used throughout the unit to arrive at the outcomes.

Student Self-Assessment

How will students reflect upon or self-assess their learning?

Formative-

– During the reading of Three Day Road, students will be writing journals reflecting on what they have read and their understanding of the material for each chapter. Students will be writing about what they believe is important to the story or storytelling within the novel. The students writing in the journals will allow me to see if they have any questions or understand the material within the given chapters. Thus, reading their journals will allow me to adapt my teaching (whether that is going back or using a different teaching method) to better adapt to my student’s needs. Furthermore, journaling allows for a running record of student thought and learning that can be referred back to by the student as well as teacher to assess learning (Self and Formative assessment).

-KWL Chart will help determine where students are and if other information is needed or in need of altering.

– Discussions throughout each mini-unit that demonstrate student comprehension and thought processes. These discussions will be using learning strategies such as Think-Pair-Share, Jigsaw, Socratic Circle, etc. and will incorporate small and large group discussion. Discussions will generally be inquiry-based but may change if a student brings up a topic worth discussing.

-Worksheets based upon these discussions will be used to determine active listening as well as note taking skills (Semi-Summative as well if necessary)

Summative-

-At the end of each mini-unit there is a summative assignment that demonstrates the knowledge that students have absorbed within each mini-unit.

-Once all mini-units are complete, a final assignment (the “My Journey” assignment) will be used as a final summative assessment tool because of its integration of all the knowledge contained within each mini-unit.

-KWL charts at the start and end of each mini-unit will allow students to assess as they go through each mini-unit and will help determine their intellectual growth for both themselves and the teacher. Students will be given the beginning KWL chart at the end so that they can see their progress and determine if they have learnt anything they previously did not know or wanted to know.

-Peer and self-assessments after the discussions to determine what they found valuable, who brought important information to the table, and how they are going to continue their learning with this new found knowledge provided by their classmates (Allows student voice).

-Students will take a journal as they read taking down any questions they have, interesting quotes, self-connections, or whatever else they deem important. After the reading of Three Day Road is finished, students will use the notes they have be writing to foster discussion and supplement conversation.

-Student’s journal entries will be a way for them to look back and assess their knowledge of the material and use what they have written and found (such as quotes) within the novel as a way to flesh out their future assignments. It can also allow them to ask for more direction or help within certain chapters or the novel as a whole based upon their assessing of their own understanding through the journal writing process (an avenue of adaptation for myself). In this way, the students can determine whether they need supplementary knowledge/ instruction or simply need to reread to find out information within the novel.

-Group discussions also allow students the ability to self-assess “on the fly” and adapt their knowledge or stance about the material based upon their peers insights.

 

 

Stage 3 – Learning Plan

What teaching and learning experiences will you use to:

  • achieve the desired results identified in Stage 1?
  • equip students to complete the assessment tasks identified in Stage 2?
Where are your students headed?  Where have they been?  How will you make sure the students know where they are going? 

What experiences do the learners bring to the unit?  How have the interests of the learners been ascertained?  Have the learners been part of the pre-planning in any way?  What individual needs do you anticipate will need to be addressed?

Learning environment:  Where can this learning best occur?  How can the physical environment be arranged to enhance learning? 

Students are now established in high school but are still finding out who they are. Especially because of the big change coming into high school in grade 9. At the start of my English class I like to talk about a few of the outcomes to show the students right off the bat what is expected of them. In this way, there are no surprises and they feel as though they are working towards a goal rather than being in the dark. As this is an ELA class, there are likely to be all sorts of experiences being brought into the classroom.

The experiences of the students is essential throughout this unit, and there is plenty of opportunity for them to share their experiences and try to connect what they’re learning with what they already know about ELA, History/ Social Studies, Health (healthy identities), and Art (for the more artistic projects). Connections can be made to the different worldviews explored within this unit and students can connect this knowledge to their own lived experiences, as well as exposing students to worldviews and experiences that are foreign to their own.

I would also like to dabble with letting students create their own assignments (Pre-planning). An example would be from the media study lesson in which my assignment is a “click-bait” advertisement. If students have a better idea (possible example I am still playing with: create a webpage based on what we believe are our online identities) then I am more than open to discussing and hashing out details with them because they will feel more involved in their learning this way.

The best learning environment will most likely be my classroom but I do love to go outside so I imagine there will be a day or two where we simply go outside to have class. I do eventually want to integrate a canoe trip into the learning to establish a more “living curriculum” as well as get my students interested with the material.

I set my desks in a very specific pattern because I feel as though it enhances discussion and comfort within the room. I try to arrange the desks into a large square/ rectangle (essentially a U pattern with the teacher’s front desk/ podium in the top gap of the U). If there are more students in the classroom then two squares, one inside the other, is formed.

How will you engage students at the beginning of the unit? (motivational set)
-Before reading the novel, I will get a paper to create a large visual KWL chart for my students that will be put up in the room (ex. green paper for what I know, Blue for what I’ve learnt, and red for what I want to know). As a class, we will then fill out what we know about the novel, its content, its author, etc… and so on and so forth. Having students come up to write on the large in-class visual chart will foster engagement and provide a visual for all the students to see throughout the reading of the novel. Furthermore, as we make our way through the book, we will continue to fill out this chart and/ or adapt it as we begin learning about the material. This will be used throughout the process for the class’s collective knowledge and can be used as a comparison (formative assessment) for the student’s individual KWL charts.

-The next engaging activity is to have the students draw what they believe is the “three day road.” This can be determined by looking at the novel’s cover, student’s prior knowledge, as well as student’s cultural understandings. We would review these drawings at the conclusion of the novel to see if the students had a better understanding or a different interpretation of the meaning or significance of the “three day road.”

-I believe that these are two effective pre-assessment tools while also successfully contributing to the formative assessment of students.

What events will help students experience and explore the enduring understandings and essential questions in the unit?  How will you equip them with needed skills and knowledge?
# Lesson Title Lesson Activities

 

CCCs Resources
1  

Diving Into the Road: Joseph Boyden’s Three Day Road

(3 weeks)

 

-Discussion Groups rather than chapter questions to discuss events within the chapter and the author’s use of different Literary Elements (can use their journal entries as well as get information for their journal entries).

-Journals will be discussed after each chapter as well as a few targeted discussion questions (Back of the Three Day Road Novel).

-These journals will be useful for the students throughout the unit because they provide a summary of the chapters as well as a way for students to express their own thoughts about the chapter. This will come in very handy as students move into the more assignment based portions of the unit. Thus, students have the ability to look back and assess their own information that they have built for themselves to more completely answer future questions as well as complete future assignments.

For the Journal: -each Chapter

-1 or 2 quotes that are important (to the chapter, book, characters, or reader)(Page numbers need to be included) and an explanation of its importance (sentence or point form).

-Paragraph about the readers thoughts, connections, and reactions to the chapter (Rosenblatt’s The Reader, The Text, The Poem- What do the words on the page do in the mind of the reader)

-(Minimum 5) Point form notes on what the reader has learnt about the characters, setting, time period, major events, etc…

DT, DSR, DS Three Day Road Novel

-Discussion Targets

-Student Journals

 

Rosenblatt’s The Reader, The Text, The Poem

2 The End is only the Beginning

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lesson Off-Shot

2 Classes

Discuss symbolism within the novel as well as symbolism as a tool for communication (within the Treaties especially). Use todaysmeet.com/ Padlet to help flesh out comments for those that may not want to speak out loud.

Treaty Essential Learnings- We Are All Treaty People handbook- Pages 48-50

-Show students Paskwa’s Pictograph (Pg. 50)

-Use “My Journey” to show different versions of a picture journey.

My Journey

-Show students my Picture story of Elijah’s Decent into the Wendigo (top of page)

 

 

 

Create a picture story of the novel Three Day Road.

See Three Day Road Lesson Plan: Picture Story Creation

 

 

 

 

Debate Prep: Includes a quarter day on research principles (appropriate sites/ content) and three quarters for student research and team coordination. Should include knowledge gained from journal entries. Library as well as computers for research will be used.

Day 2- 1o minutes to coordinate team and finalization of points. The rest of the class-

Debate- The morality of killing the wendigo. Good or Evil? Worldviews/ perspectives.

DT, DL, DSR -Electronic Resources

-Paper

-Pen

Treaty Essential Learnings- We Are All Treaty People handbook

-My picture story

3 Literary Analysis

(3 classes)

-KWL Chart- Literary Elements

-Look at the literary elements of the novel (ex. imagery, foreshadowing, allusion, simile etc.). This will be done interspersed throughout the reading of the novel.

-Students in the outer circle will be posting notes and/ or comments on Padlet/ todaysmeet.com that will allow them to influence the inner circle without interrupting (if needed or structured in this manner. It really depends on what method you use. Personally, I do not allow the outer circle to interact with the inner during the conversation.). Otherwise, students can use this as a spot to pin ideas or comments that they will use when coming into the inner circle but may have otherwise forgotten had they not written it down. This then allows the students that were on the inner circle to view what the outer circle was thinking about as well as look at some of the potential inner circle points for this round.

-A small Socratic circle will be done in preparation for the larger/ longer circle. Here, a list of questions will be created in preparation for the big circle to aid in material for the next class. (Socratic Circle-ception- This Socratic Circle will be about what makes a Socratic Circle successful as well as provide ideas to bring to the next days planned Socratic Circle.)

DL, DT -Novel

-Literary Elements list

-Pen

-Paper

4 Socratic Circle

(2 Class)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Socratic Circle Follow up (3 classes)

-Two Separate Socratic Circles-

1) how do the literary elements present within the novel allow us better insight into the characters and their journeys within the novel.

2) Is Elijah actually Xavier’s alter-ego? A creation of X’s imagination to deal with the trauma within the world around him.

-5 minutes is dedicated to students preparing last minute information gathering/ note taking.

-2 minutes to fully set up into the Socratic Circle.

-32 minutes (two 15 minute sections with a 2 minute break in between) for the Socratic Circle

-Discussion based off of the circles and finishing up any pressing issues or necessary questions or acknowledgements. 5 mins

-Approx. 15 minutes to write a minimum three sentence review of the Socratic circle process (can be 2 likes and a dislike or 2 dislikes and a like but both must be represented)

 

Based upon all the information gathered up until this point, students will write a review of the novel that expresses and justifies an opinion about the text without summarizing the plot. What did you like? Not Like?

KWL Chart Revision

DT, DL, DSR -List of previous questions

-Paper

-Pen

 

5  

Who Are We?

(2 classes)

KWL Chart- Identity

What is Identity?

What Shapes Identity?

Can Identity change or is it static?

-Write about something that you believe shapes your identity. How does it shape you? Why did you choose this particular thing/ event?

Create a poem about identity. Look at Poems about Identity- ex. Gregory Scofield’s They Taught Her

DT, DII -Pen

-Paper

– Gregory Scofield’s They Taught Her

6 You… says the Media

 

Media Studies

-How does the media shape our identities?

-Media awareness- stereotypes perpetuated by the media (Sexism, racializing, violence)

-What is the difference between fact and fiction? How can one tell online?

 

Create a one page “click-bait” advertisement about yourself– Students look at “click-bait” advertisements on the internet and create a one page advertisement story  (includes a good eye-catching caption picture) about themselves.

DT, DII, DSR, DL -Pen

-Paper

-Media Studies Handout

-Electronic resources

7  

Identity Unmasked

(3 classes)

 

Assignment-Create a mask based on the way you see yourself

-Create a mask based on how you believe people see you

-Interview others to ask what they believe your identity is (how they portray you) and create a mask based on these traits/ viewpoints.

-Using these three representations, write about the differences and similarities, why you believe there are differences, and what might account for these differences.

Discussion -How does this information shape identity? Change identity?

Do our peers affect identity? Do they change our identity? In what ways?

KWL Chart Revision

DT,DII,DL, DSR -Pen

-Paper

-(Possible mask sheet/ paper macheing 1 mask)

8 Culture Club

 

 

KWL Chart- Culture and FNMI perspectives

-Lesson on Worldviews- Pages 26-47 of Treaty Essential Learnings- We Are All Treaty People handbook. – looking at the different worldviews and the way they apply and affect the story within Three Day Road as well as our world/ society as a whole.

-Medicine wheel teachings

-How does the culture (and worldviews) reflected in the writing affect your understanding of it? How does your own culture affect your understanding of it?

-Aboriginal ways of knowing- medicine wheel- looking at the way the character’s stories fall into the four categories and the ways in which the characters are “sick” (or not fulfilling all aspects of the medicine wheels ideologies)

-How do aboriginal ways of knowing affect the novel? The characters? Our own viewpoints?

-In what ways is Three Day Road relevant to our own time and circumstances?

DL, DSR, DII, DT -Pen

-Paper

-Medicine Wheel

Treaty Essential Learnings- We Are All Treaty People handbook

9 You’re in for a Treat-y -Begin with a Kahoot/ PowerPoint of Treaty Trivia.

-How does the understanding of Treaties enhance or alter our understanding of the play?

-Treaty Relations- Overview of the treaties that were signed within Canada with heavier emphasis on the Saskatchewan treaties. Looking at the promises and failed follow through.

– Do Treaty relations affect all people? If so, How? If not, why do you think so? Create a Padlet/ todaysmeet.com so that students can all comment in real time as well as respond to their peers comments that are on Padlet/ todaysmeet.com in front of them. (Students can then look back on everything that has been said and make any notes etc.. out of the comments).

– How do lessons learnt from the Treaties tie into the study of this novel? Treaty Essential Learnings –Brother-to-brother relations, Historical Context, Contemporary issues, etc.)

-Analyze the impact that Canadian Treaties could have if implemented on a global scale.

Treaty Essential Learnings- We Are All Treaty People– Pages 15-17- The Treaty Relationship

DT, DII, DSR -Treaty Handouts

-Office of the Treaty Commissioner handouts

-Computer/ phones/ ipads

10 Residential Schools- destroying  knowledge and culture

 

 

-What are residential schools? What was their effect in the play? In real life?

-Look at books from the reading for reconciliation initiative. Ex. Born with a Tooth by Joseph Boyden, No Time to Say Goodbye: Children’s Stories of Kuper Island Residential School by

Sylvia Olsen, Rita Morris & Ann Sam, Residential Schools: With the Words & Images of Survivors by Larry Oskiniko, Kookum’s Red Shoes by Peter Eyvindson. These, among many others, are useful to see the plethora of injustices that were imposed upon the First Nations people.

(Can get these resources from Saskatoon Public Library)

-How did the main characters fight against the residential school teachings to combat the loss of their culture? How have survivors combated the loss of culture? Is this a loss of Identity?

 

-Gord Downie’s The Secret Path–  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yGd764YU9yc

(Possible coordination with the history teacher to watch the whole story (2 hrs and 10 mins). It builds off of my unit as well as touches upon several outcomes within history/social studies as well)

 

-I would really like to get an Elder to come and speak with my class about the horrors and pain that the residential schools wrought on an entire people. I feel as though this is an invaluable experience and the full emotional impact will be lost if I cannot find a speaker. Nevertheless, if one is not available this lesson will still commence.

 

Assignment- will be an Eye Witness Account/ report that answers the 5W’s and H for facts about what happened and uses descriptive details. The Elder would have used descriptive details in his/her account of the events.

Oral and symbolic tradition mini-unit wrap up. Students present their story orally to the class touching on the above details. Thus, students create a presentation from their “eye witness” account writing. Students create a picture journey (see picture story assignment) for the students to follow as they tell their story (visual stimuli).

KWL Chart Revision

DT, DSR, DII -Pen

-Paper

No Time to Say Goodbye: Children’s Stories of Kuper Island Residential School

– Born with a Tooth

Residential Schools: With the Words & Images of Survivors

Kookum’s Red Shoes

-Computer/Projector

11

 

Moving Forward to History

 

 

KWL Chart- The Great War and its Effect on Canadian Peoples

– Using todaysmeet.com/ Padlet to add to verbal discussion

-Discussion on the Great War. Historical context- Beginnings, major players, toll (body, mind, emotions). Canadian implications- How did it affect our people? Was everyone affected? How were gender roles defined before the war? After? Effects on society.

– WE ANSWERED THE CALL by The Office of the Treaty Commissioner- A History of the Saskatchewan First Nations’ Contribution to Canada’s Freedom and Democracy- DVD on First Nations involvement in the war as well as Frist Nations Veterans stories.

 

-How was the war portrayed in the novel?

-What significance did the war have in the novel? What significance did it have for the main characters?

DT, DSR, DII -Pen

-Paper

-We Answered The Call

12

 

The Rest is History

(3 classes)

 

Assignment- Students will write a Historical Persona Essay that shows understanding of the person, events, and the gathered details about the place and the time.

 

KWL Chart Revision

DL, DT -Computers (research resources)

-Pen

-Paper

13 Final Project

(1 Week)

“My Journey”Students will create a final project for the end of the unit (with full integration of each of the mini-units) on Three Day Road based on a journey within their own lives that they have undertaken.

-They can choose between a variety of options to complete this task such as creating a photo journey, create a mini play/ monologue, an essay, or they can come to me with an idea. Rubric will be co-created with the students.

DT, DII, DL, DSR -Pen

-Paper

Assess and Reflect (Stage 4)
Considerations Comments
Required Areas of Study:

 Is there alignment between outcomes, performance assessment and learning experiences?

I believe so but then again I am bias. I believe I have created a fairly comprehensive novel study that effectively targets the major outcomes and necessary elements of the English A 10 Curriculum. My next order of business in regards to this unit is to do crossover work with the History/ Social Studies teacher in the war unit as well as in the Treaties discussions/ lessons. The next step after that is to go to the PAA teacher and discuss the inclusion of creating a canoe as a class for a large project. After this, I want to contact the Phys. Ed teacher and have the students go canoeing (hopefully in their newly made one) to simulate Niska and X’s trip down the river. I believe this would integrate “living curriculum” really well as well as implement place-based-learning in my classroom. Furthermore, it would be easier to get funding for this excursion if it includes other classes and teachers while simultaneously hitting on several objectives for those teachers classrooms as well. All of this together would create an awesome holistic learning experience for my students that would hugely benefit (and motivate) them to want to continue learning in English Language Arts.
Adaptive Dimension:

Have I made purposeful adjustments to the curriculum content (not outcomes), instructional practices, and/or the learning environment to meet the learning needs and diversities of all my students?

For struggling students:

-Work with the EA’s, LAT’s, specialists (ex. hearing) in the room (if there are any) to get a better idea of the needs of any student with exceptionalities.

-Group work to help lighten their load

-Lots of discussion that they have the opportunity to listen to and create understanding from others

-Difficulty options for projects (can go as easy or hard as they need while still maintaining the projects integrity) (Ex. see challenge example below)

-Different options for the final project that will allow them to choose what they are most comfortable doing.

-Learning using collaborative group work allows struggling students to only have to know a part of a larger concept in order to contribute to the collective knowledge of the group. Thus, the concepts do not seem as overwhelming and the student(s) can learn the major concepts from one another. (Lightening the intellectual load)

-Students with reading/writing difficulties: I will provide notes with essential information for the students (note handouts) or adapt to an easier format for these students (ex. students can type, have fill-in-the-blank versions of the notes, or have a scribe). The additions of the graphic organizers, like the KWL chart on the wall, helps struggling students as well because they have something to refer to and extrapolate from. Additionally, having them create a mind map of the days learning can also help them synthesize their thoughts and give them a resource to refer back to if they become lost.

-Exceptional students with focus/attention issues: There is lots of collaborative group work within my unit in order to get them out of their desks and discussing with their peers. Thus, more active engagement in the lessons will allow them to move more than simply sit still and listen.

-Students with Autism or Anxiety- I will put an outline/ schedule for the day so that they can easily track/plan their day as well as see the transitions throughout the day. I would also further warn them of any potential changes throughout the day such as fire drills or guest speakers. Furthermore, in my learning plan first section, specifically stating some of the outcomes of the course, including my expectations of their learning, is an attempt at helping logical learning styles and can alleviate student anxiety around the context and expectations of the class.

-For EAL students: The novel itself has Cree words within it showing that other languages are important in understanding culture as well as contexts within the novel. I think it is important to show that you, as the teacher, are trying to connect with these students and simply attempting to learn a word or two within their language shows that you are willing to learn and include who they are outside of a “non-English” speaker. I also believe that acknowledging their success in successfully speaking English is more important than correcting their mistakes. I always tell my students that “I bet you know more words in English than I do in ____” (ex. Tagalog, Cree, Turkish, etc…). Thus, acknowledging that they are accomplishing something is highly important not only to motivation and engagement but to self-efficacy as well. On a more specific note, providing definitions of larger words within the notes can be beneficial for language learners especially if given beforehand so the students can prepare their understanding. Furthermore, if they need, I am more than willing to give them more time to do assignments because of the added and time consuming task of learning and processing another language on top of the learning from the lessons and assignments themselves. Everything above can also be given in advance to the EAL teachers so that they can do the same work in their class as we are doing in class so that a harmony is created.

-Behavioral Issues- Through offering choice in assignments throughout the unit, many of these issues can be curbed because I am not explicitly telling them what to do. Furthermore, allowing these students to choose what they are going to do helps to foster an interest and engagement in the material and allows them to take the reins of their own learning. If one of these students with behavioral issues wants to take the class on a “body break” army obstacle course that X and Elijah may have had to train on then I am all for this movement inclusion.

 

For students who need a challenge:

– Up the ante for them. Make them delve deeper into the project. (Ex. rather than talk about a trip to the store for their picture journey, these students have to talk about a complex topic such as overcoming claustrophobia)

-Pair the gifted students with a struggling student (This needs to be monitored closely to ensure beneficial learning for both students).  If the gifted student has a strong grasp on the course concepts, paring them with a struggling student to explain the concept can help guide learning for both students. Yet, if this pairing isn’t helping either student, I would pair the gifted students with other high-achieving students that could stimulate them intellectually.

-The emphasis on Bloom’s Taxonomy highest order function, create, allows gifted students the freedom of choice to create a project that is within their higher creative levels.

-If student(s) are comfortable and have adequate time to prepare, have them teach/ co-teach one of the days on a topic that they choose. Have them integrate it into the planned lessons but from the student’s point of view.

Instructional Approaches:

Do I use a variety of teacher directed and student centered instructional approaches?

Yes. Think-Pair-Share, Jigsaw, Socratic Circle. Class discussion. Chunking. Lecture style.

Using a plethora of group work activities, students had the opportunity to work through ideas and concepts collectively instead of individually. In this way, I attempt to maintain better engagement with the material as well as create a more active classroom environment. Furthermore, students have the ability to teach and learn from one another through experiences, discussions, assignments, technology, and reflections/journals.

Although I stand by the strategies I have used, it is also important to be adaptable within the moment as well. If the strategy I have chosen doesn’t seem to be “working” and students are not “getting it,” then it is important to shift gears and try a different strategy. Thus, having a variety of instructional strategies at the ready is important for any teacher arsenal.

Resource Based Learning:

 Do the students have access to various resources on an ongoing basis?

They can use computers, ipads, and/ or, if allowed, phones to look up necessary data. As of right now, I need to incorporate more technology into my unit. I am including a media studies lesson within my identity unit that will be heavily electronically based. Furthermore, I plan on including todaysmeet.com/ Padlet during our class discussions so that ideas and/ or questions can be brought up in real time without interrupting speakers. This is an excellent way to use technology within the classroom while still maintaining the integrity of the discussion. Additionally, Kahoot is a fun way to introduce discussion topics and is a great motivational set because it fosters engagement and, generally, a few laughs.

 

FNM/I Content and Perspectives/Gender Equity/Multicultural Education:

Have I nurtured and promoted diversity while honoring each child’s identity?

I believe that I have done a fairly good job of incorporating FNMI content especially since I have a full mini-unit devoted to this. Furthermore, my identity unit is tailored to the individual but also looks at everything that makes and influences an individual to become who they are. Thus, FNMI content will be almost inevitably included as students learn more about each worldview and how we are all treaty people. One of the most important practices in my room is promoting inclusion and, thus, I think that fostering positive discussion about these topics alleviates their stigma.

 

 

 

Three Day Road Outcome Rubric                                                                                          Name: ________________________

Grade: __________________________

Outcome Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4
L M H L M H L M H L M H
CC A10.1 : Compose and create a range of     visual , multimedia , oral , and written texts that explore:

  • identity (e.g., Foundational Stories);
  • social responsibility (e.g., Destiny and Challenges of Life); and
  • social action (agency) (e.g., Human Existence).
Beginning Progressing Use representing, speaking, and writing to respond to experiences or texts (e.g., a staged dramatic scene, a television episode, a significant personal event). Established
CR A10.4 : Read, interpret, and draw conclusions about the ideas, information,        concepts, and themes presented in a variety of literary (including poems, plays, essays, short stories, novels) and informational (including magazines, newspapers, and on-line information) texts. Beginning Progressing Read, comprehend, and explain the human experiences and values reflected in various literary and informational texts created by First Nations, Métis, Saskatchewan, Canadian, and international authors from various cultural communities. Established
CC A10.3 : Use oral language to express a

range of information and ideas in formal

(including a prepared talk on a familiar topic, an oral presentation of a passage of prose or poetry, and a retelling of a narrative or a recounting of an experience or event) and informal (discussion and group work) situations.

Beginning Progressing Recognize and adjust oral presentation elements effectively (i.e., articulation, pronunciation, volume, tempo, pitch, stress, gestures, eye contact, facial expression, and poise) in keeping with purpose, audience needs, and individual cultural and linguistic background. Established

Comments:

 

My Comments about the rubric:

  • This is my preliminary rubric and I will be adapting it based upon discussion with my class. Another way that I may go is towards the style of the dance rubric that I will provide as well.
  • This was constructed using the Saskatchewan Curriculum Builder Add-On to Google Chrome.
  • The highlighted text is based on the cognitive domain material.

 

Assessment OF Learning (summative) Assess the students after learning to evaluate what they have learned.

-How the individual topics as well as the topics as a whole (cumulative) are portrayed within the students writing about their own personal journey.

-The extent of detail in which the student uses to create their final project will be assessed.

-The level of inclusion of the topics Literary Elements/Perspectives, Identity and Relationships, The Effect of War on Canada and its People, and Indigenous Perspectives will be assessed.

 

This is for my final project based on the summative learning from the Three Day Road unit as a whole. This project consists of students writing/ sharing a journey that they have undertaken within their lives. It is a very open project that can be easily narrowed down to something as simple as the time they got a flat tire heading to Grandma’s house to advanced such as their journey into or out of friendships/ hardships or whatever else they may like to do. Furthermore, this project has a wide spread of options to complete this task such as writing an essay, creating a picture book, creating a scrapbook, or creating a small play to name a few. I am also very open to students coming up with their own ideas that, of course, must be discussed with me.

 

The reason that the majority of the rubric is not filled out is because I want to co-construct criteria with my students. I want them to help create the guidelines of their assessment so that they are more invested in reaching their co-constructed goals. In this way, I hope to foster engagement in not only the project itself but in all aspects of the final project creation. I chose to only fill in the “meeting” category (level 3) with an indicator of the affiliated outcomes because I want the students to create the material that goes into that category. The indicators within the level 3 category are simply guidelines to focus student thought. Additionally, I only want to fill out the higher categories (level 3/4) with co-created criteria because I want students to see what they have to do to achieve this level rather than what isn’t meeting expectation (focus on the positive rather than the negative).

 

This rubric will change depending on what projects the students do as well as the criteria that they feel they should be assessed on.

 

KWL Chart (with summarization section)

Thoughts Organizer:

 

Name: ____________________­____                                 Class: ___________________________

Summarize:

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

What I learned:

1.

 

2.

 

3.

 

4.

 

5.

 

6.

What I want to know:

1.

 

2.

 

3.

 

4.

 

5.

 

6.

What I already know:

1.

 

2.

 

3.

 

4.

 

5.

 

6.

 

­­

I checked-

Before reading:                □  Headings and subheadings       

                                              □  Italic, bold, and underlined word

                                              □  Pictures, tables, and graphs      

                                              □  Questions or other key information

 

After previewing:            □  Made Predictions

 

After reading:                    □  Discussed with a partner           

                                                □  Reviewed Predictions

                                                □  Rechecked all points from before reading

 

 

Lesson Plan Title: Picture Story Creation                                                                                    

Date: Undetermined               Subject: ELA            Grade:  10       Topic: Three Day Road

Time: 3 hrs. (3 Classes) – Possibly 2 depending on speed of completion

Materials: Pen, Paper, Markers, Camera (possible), Electronic Resources

Stage 1- Desired Results – you may use student friendly language
What do they need to understand, know, and/or able to do?

-How a picture story is a synthesis of the main ideas/ plot points within the story and can be used for clarification and quick recollection of material.

-How “using your own words” to describe the story (using the picture story) shows a fuller comprehension of the material.

 

Broad Areas of Learning:

Developing Lifelong Learners-

Students who are engaged in constructing and applying English language arts knowledge naturally build a positive disposition towards learning. Throughout their study of English language arts, students gain understandings, skills, and strategies to become more competent and confident language users.

 

Developing a Sense of Self and Community-

To learn English language arts, students need not only to use the English language but also to interact with each other. They use language to interact and to respond effectively with others and to build community.

 

Cross-Curricular Competencies:

Developing Thinking-

Learners construct knowledge to make sense of the world around them. They develop understanding by building on what is already known. This key competency concerns the ability to make sense of information, experiences, and ideas through thinking contextually,

critically, and creatively. The philosophy of learning in English language arts is inquiry-based, and students use their language and thinking skills to explore a range of topics, issues, and themes

Developing Identity and Interdependence-

The ability to act autonomously in an interdependent world requires an awareness of the natural environment, of social and cultural expectations, and of the possibilities for individual and group accomplishments. English Language Arts require students to explore ideas and issues of identity, social responsibility, diversity, sustainability, and personal agency.

Developing Literacies-

Literacies provide many ways, including the use of various language systems and media, to interpret the world and express understanding of it. Literacies involve the evolution of interrelated skills, strategies, and understandings that facilitate an individual’s ability to participate fully and equitably in a variety of roles and contexts – school, home, and local and global communities. To achieve this competency requires developing skills, strategies, and understandings related to various literacies in order to explore and interpret the world and communicate meaning. English language arts requires students to use different literacies, including language literacy, effectively and contextually to represent ideas and understanding in multiple, flexible ways.

Developing Social Responsibility-

This project requires the ability to participate with others in accomplishing shared or common goals. This competency is achieved through using moral reasoning processes, engaging in communitarian thinking and dialogue, and taking action to contribute to learners’ physical, social, and cultural environments. In English language arts, students explore their social responsibility and work toward common goals to improve the lives of others and the natural and constructed worlds.

 

Outcome(s):

CR A10.1-

Comprehend and respond to a variety of visual, oral, print, and multimedia texts that address:

• identity (e.g., Foundational Stories);

• social responsibility (e.g., Destiny and Challenges of Life);

• social action (agency) (e.g., Human Existence).

– View, listen to, read, and respond to First Nations and Métis resources and other texts that reflect diverse personal identities, worldviews, and backgrounds (e.g., appearance, culture, socioeconomic status, ability, age, gender, language, social structures, and decision making).

– Identify connections between self, texts, and culture.

– Develop understanding and interpretations of a variety of texts by drawing upon personal experiences and prior knowledge of texts and language.

– Respond thoughtfully and critically to text providing support from text to justify response.

CR A10.4-

Read, interpret, and draw conclusions about the ideas, information, concepts, and themes presented in a variety of literary (including poems, plays, essays, short stories, novels) and informational (including magazines, newspapers, and on-line information) texts

-Read, comprehend, and explain the human experiences and values reflected in various literary and informational texts created by First Nations, Métis, Saskatchewan, Canadian, and international authors from various cultural communities.

– Demonstrate active reading behaviours including:

• establishing a purpose for reading such as to learn, interpret, and enjoy

• skimming, scanning, and reading closely

• identifying and analyzing explicit and implicit messages, viewpoints, and concepts

• relating understanding of a range of texts to personal experiences, purposes, audiences, and other texts

• constructing images based on text descriptions (Key)

• discussing and analyzing meanings, ideas, language, and literary and informational quality in a range of contemporary and historical texts

CC A10.1

Compose and create a range of visual, multimedia, oral, and written texts that explore:

• identity (e.g., Foundational Stories);

• social responsibility (e.g., Destiny and Challenges of Life);

• social action (agency) (e.g., Human Existence).

-Create spoken, written, and other representations that include:

•        coherence, logical progression, and support for ideas

•        clear patterns of organization

-organize information using appropriate forms (e.g., charts, diagrams, outlines, electronic databases, storyboards)

-draw logical conclusion from information and consider how to best present to identified audience

CC A10.2

Explain and present to a familiar audience the key ideas and events (actual or based on a text studied) through an appropriate combination of charts, diagrams, sound, models, drama, and print.

-Use props, visual aids, graphics, and electronic media to enhance the appeal and accuracy of presentations.

-Analyze, organize, and convert information into different forms (e.g., charts, graphs, drawings).

 

PGP Goals:

1.2       ethical behaviour and the ability to work in a collaborative manner for the good of all learners– Students are put into groups in which they need to work in a collaborative environment. In this way, students that may struggle have a support system that they can use to increase their learning.

2.3       knowledge of First Nations, Metis and Inuit Culture and History (e.g., Treaties, Residential School, Scrip, and Worldview)- Three Day Road is written by an Aboriginal author and contains FNMI content. Therefore, knowledge of FNMI content is necessary to adequately interpret the picture stories.

2.4       ability to use technologies readily, strategically and appropriately– Use of electronic resources such as PowerPoint and image searches help everyone within the classroom.

3.2       the ability to use a wide variety of responsive instructional strategies and methodologies to accommodate learning styles of individual learners and support their growth as social, intellectual, physical and spiritual beings– Use of group work as well as the Jigsaw Teaching strategy helps to accommodate all learners and, furthermore, helps to ensure the success of all members of the classroom.

 4.2      the ability to incorporate First Nations, Metis, and Inuit knowledge, content and perspective into all teaching areas- FNMI content is in both the book that is being studied as well as the students responses to this content. Furthermore, FNMI knowledge is important in adequately interpreting the picture stories.

Stage 2- Assessment
Assessment FOR Learning (formative) Assess the students during the learning to help determine next steps. 

Students understanding/ comprehension will be shown throughout the reading of Three Day Road by Joseph Boyden. Additionally, checkups during the creation process to make sure students are on the right track will be done. Student’s choice of pictures will also dictate if they understand the text and allows them to use higher order thinking as they must justify their choices. Ex. A person paddling a canoe does not fit with Xavier’s story after the war because he is having withdrawal symptoms in the bottom of a canoe. Therefore, if a group chooses this picture for Xavier then they may need more help or clarification.

Assessment OF Learning (summative) Assess the students after learning to evaluate what they have learned.

At the end of the lessons, students will hand in their collaborative work on their picture story for their designated chapters. Students will come together once they are finished in a Jigsaw teaching strategy to share their chapter picture story with the group. Thus, the class as a whole creates a full picture journey of Three Day Road.

Marking will be based upon: coherence, accuracy, understanding (of audience), and detail. The extent of which will be co-created with my students and, thus, a rubric will be created based upon these topics linked into the outcomes and indicators within the curriculum.

Stage 3- Learning Plan- Motivational/Anticipatory Set

(Frontloading Activity- Good for EAL learners and learners who are cognitively challenged)

–          Show PowerPoint of my picture journey of getting to school without using words (1st half). Students have to guess what happened based on the pictures (Easy).

–          The second half is a picture journey of a scene from How To Train Your Dragon. It is depicting the first arena battle when they are learning to fight dragons to save their village. This one is a little bit more difficult because it will not be spelt out for them (Hard).

–          Show the students my picture of Elijah turning into the Wendigo. Discuss how this shows a journey.

–          Discuss the ways in which Aboriginal cultures used symbolism as a form of communication and understanding (within the Treaties especially). Show the students Paskwa’s Pictograph. Treaty Essential Learnings- We Are All Treaty People handbook- Pages 48-50

–           Discuss symbolism within the novel

–          Discuss with the students how a picture journey can enhance understanding and aid in recollection.

Main Procedures/Strategies:

–          Students are broken into small groups to work on creating a picture story of a few (depending on group size) chapters from Three Day Road.

-Approximately 3-5 students per group that will take approximately 3-5 chapters each.

-A minimum of 5 and a maximum of 15 pictures per chapter is necessary (exceptions based on chapter sizes may be necessary)

-Each group has to share why they chose the pictures they did and what significance it has to the chapter and to the story as a whole.

Adaptations/Differentiation:

-Can draw, take photos, or use electronic resources to find images to use.

-Group work allows students to collaborate and help students that may otherwise struggle. (See Unit Plan Adaptations and Differentiation section)

Closing of lesson: (Last class)

–          Accumulate all the picture stories into one cohesive whole for the students to use as a resource throughout the unit. (Jigsaw Teaching Strategy)

–          Discuss how this resource can benefit the students throughout the rest of the unit on Three Day Road (reference, recollection, future assignment example)

 

 

Lesson Plan Title: Residential Schools                                                                                  

Date: Undetermined               Subject: ELA/ Social Studies            Grade:  10       Topic: Three Day Road/ Residential Schools

Time: 3 classes

Materials: Pen, Paper, Ears

Stage 1- Desired Results – you may use student friendly language
What do they need to understand, know, and/or able to do?

– Residential school was developed to try to teach First Nation’s children to leave their cultural ways for that of the newcomers.

-Residential school was extremely difficult for First Nation’s children because they had to leave their families and communities for extended periods to go away to school and experienced horrible conditions within the schools including physical, mental, emotional, and sexual abuse.

-Residential school affects First Nations people today because of the ongoing intergenerational trauma that was a direct result of the conditions and abuses endured by the First Nations people

-All Canadians can help the healing process by learning about and understanding the truths about the history and legacy of Indian Residential Schools

-Stories are a powerful device of healing, persuasion, information, and engagement

 

Broad Areas of Learning:

Developing Lifelong Learners-

Students who are engaged in constructing and applying English language arts knowledge naturally build a positive disposition towards learning. Throughout their study of English language arts, students gain understandings, skills, and strategies to become more competent and confident language users.

 

Developing a Sense of Self and Community-

To learn English language arts, students need not only to use the English language but also to interact with each other. They use language to interact and to respond effectively with others and to build community.

 

Engaged Citizens-

In the English language arts, students learn how language enables them to make a difference in their personal, peer, family, and community lives. Language gives them a sense of agency and an ability to make a difference in their community and the world in which they live.

 

Cross-Curricular Competencies:

Developing Thinking-

Learners construct knowledge to make sense of the world around them. They develop understanding by building on what is already known. This key competency concerns the ability to make sense of information, experiences, and ideas through thinking contextually,

critically, and creatively. The philosophy of learning in English language arts is inquiry-based, and students use their language and thinking skills to explore a range of topics, issues, and themes

Developing Identity and Interdependence-

The ability to act autonomously in an interdependent world requires an awareness of the natural environment, of social and cultural expectations, and of the possibilities for individual and group accomplishments. English Language Arts require students to explore ideas and issues of identity, social responsibility, diversity, sustainability, and personal agency.

Developing Literacies-

Literacies provide many ways, including the use of various language systems and media, to interpret the world and express understanding of it. Literacies involve the evolution of interrelated skills, strategies, and understandings that facilitate an individual’s ability to participate fully and equitably in a variety of roles and contexts – school, home, and local and global communities. To achieve this competency requires developing skills, strategies, and understandings related to various literacies in order to explore and interpret the world and communicate meaning. English language arts requires students to use different literacies, including language literacy, effectively and contextually to represent ideas and understanding in multiple, flexible ways.

Developing Social Responsibility-

This project requires the ability to participate with others in accomplishing shared or common goals. This competency is achieved through using moral reasoning processes, engaging in communitarian thinking and dialogue, and taking action to contribute to learners’ physical, social, and cultural environments. In English language arts, students explore their social responsibility and work toward common goals to improve the lives of others and the natural and constructed worlds.

 

Outcome(s):

CR A10.1-

Comprehend and respond to a variety of visual, oral, print, and multimedia texts that address:

• identity (e.g., Foundational Stories);

• social responsibility (e.g., Destiny and Challenges of Life);

• social action (agency) (e.g., Human Existence).

– View, listen to, read, and respond to First Nations and Métis resources and other texts that reflect diverse personal identities, worldviews, and backgrounds (e.g., appearance, culture, socioeconomic status, ability, age, gender, language, social structures, and decision making).

– Identify connections between self, texts, and culture.

– Develop understanding and interpretations of a variety of texts by drawing upon personal experiences and prior knowledge of texts and language.

– Respond thoughtfully and critically to text providing support from text to justify response.

CR A10.4-

Read, interpret, and draw conclusions about the ideas, information, concepts, and themes presented in a variety of literary (including poems, plays, essays, short stories, novels) and informational (including magazines, newspapers, and on-line information) texts

-Read, comprehend, and explain the human experiences and values reflected in various literary and informational texts created by First Nations, Métis, Saskatchewan, Canadian, and international authors from various cultural communities.

– Demonstrate active reading behaviours including:

• establishing a purpose for reading such as to learn, interpret, and enjoy

• skimming, scanning, and reading closely

• identifying and analyzing explicit and implicit messages, viewpoints, and concepts

• relating understanding of a range of texts to personal experiences, purposes, audiences, and other texts

• constructing images based on text descriptions (Key)

• discussing and analyzing meanings, ideas, language, and literary and informational quality in a range of contemporary and historical texts

CC A10.1

Compose and create a range of visual, multimedia, oral, and written texts that explore:

• identity (e.g., Foundational Stories);

• social responsibility (e.g., Destiny and Challenges of Life);

• social action (agency) (e.g., Human Existence).

-Create spoken, written, and other representations that include:

•        coherence, logical progression, and support for ideas

•        clear patterns of organization

-organize information using appropriate forms (e.g., charts, diagrams, outlines, electronic databases, storyboards)

-draw logical conclusion from information and consider how to best present to identified audience

CC A10.2

Explain and present to a familiar audience the key ideas and events (actual or based on a text studied) through an appropriate combination of charts, diagrams, sound, models, drama, and print.

-Use props, visual aids, graphics, and electronic media to enhance the appeal and accuracy of presentations.

-Analyze, organize, and convert information into different forms (e.g., charts, graphs, drawings).

 

PGP Goals:

1.2       ethical behaviour and the ability to work in a collaborative manner for the good of all learners– Students are put into groups in which they need to work in a collaborative environment. In this way, students that may struggle have a support system that they can use to increase their learning and comfort.

1.3       a commitment to social justice and the capacity to nurture an inclusive and equitable environment for the empowerment of all learners–  It is important to recognize injustices throughout history such as this. The first step to reconciliation is to admit to the mistake and recognize the merit of legitimizing the survivor’s stories so that the truth can help future generations and foster healing between the relationships of all members of society.

2.1       knowledge of Canadian History, especially in reference to Saskatchewan and Western Canada- This lesson is based upon history in relation to Saskatchewan as well as Canada as a whole.

2.3       knowledge of First Nations, Metis and Inuit Culture and History (e.g., Treaties, Residential School, Scrip, and Worldview)- Three Day Road is written by an Aboriginal author and contains FNMI content. Therefore, knowledge of FNMI content is essential to both the novel as well as the lesson material (residential schools). This is a direct inclusion of FNMI content.

2.4       ability to use technologies readily, strategically and appropriately– Use of electronic resources such as YouTube to show differing perspectives to my own allows students to see the breadth of the effects of residential schools on the Aboriginal peoples. It also allows a more intimate view by showing real survivor stories that I simply do not have.

3.2       the ability to use a wide variety of responsive instructional strategies and methodologies to accommodate learning styles of individual learners and support their growth as social, intellectual, physical and spiritual beings– Use of group work as well as the Jigsaw Teaching strategy helps to accommodate all learners and, furthermore, helps to ensure the success of all members of the classroom.

 4.2      the ability to incorporate First Nations, Metis, and Inuit knowledge, content and perspective into all teaching areas- FNMI content is in both the book that is being studied as well as the students responses to this content. Furthermore, FNMI knowledge is important in adequately interpreting and recognizing the truth behind the residential school stories.

4.3       the capacity to engage in program planning to shape ‘lived curriculum’ that brings learner needs, subject matter, and contextual variables together in developmentally appropriate, culturally responsive and meaningful ways- The inclusion of the speaker allows the students to see that this has more effect than simply within stories. This emotional connection with the speaker makes the students “live the curriculum” and work towards reconciliation as well as decolonization. In this way, the students take what they are learning from this unit and apply it to their everyday life becoming more active and engaged citizens within both their local and global communities.

Stage 2- Assessment
Assessment FOR Learning (formative) Assess the students during the learning to help determine next steps. 

KWL charts to track students prior knowledge as well as the knowledge they gain from the lesson. Journal entries (as a continuation of the reading journal) in the same style as the students did during the reading of Three Day Road

-1 or 2 quotes that are important (to the chapter, book, characters, or reader) and an explanation of its importance (sentence or point form).

-Paragraph about the readers thoughts, connections, and reactions to the videos (Rosenblatt’s The Reader, The Text, The Poem- What do the words on the page do in the mind of the reader)

-(Minimum 10) Point form notes on what the reader has learnt about the characters, setting, time period, major events, etc… throughout all videos altogether (not 10 per video)

Assessment OF Learning (summative) Assess the students after learning to evaluate what they have learned.

This lesson is building to the Eye Witness Account/ report that answers the 5W’s and H for facts about what happened and uses descriptive details and then the presentation of these writings orally to the class as a “story.”

-Oral and symbolic tradition- mini-unit wrap up. Students present their personalized story orally to the class (or, if a student is reticent about this activity, with the teacher outside of class time) touching on the above details. Thus, students create a presentation from their “eye witness” account writing. (The Elder would have used descriptive details in his/her account of the events and, thus, is the scaffold of this project). Students create a picture journey (see picture story assignment) for the students to follow as they tell their story (visual stimuli).

Marking will be based upon: coherence, accuracy, understanding (of audience and material discussed), and detail. The extent of which will be co-created with my students and, thus, a rubric will be created based upon these topics linked into the outcomes and indicators within the curriculum.

Stage 3- Learning Plan- Motivational/Anticipatory Set

-KWL chart on Residential schools- what they know, what they want to know, and (at the end of class) what they learnt- I personally like KWL charts because they give a concrete understanding for both student and teacher about where the students are at and the knowledge that they are bringing into the classroom. Furthermore, KWL charts provide a running record of student learning and insights as they are used throughout the unit. (I am hoping that by the time they are in grade 10 they would have touched or, in detail, covered residential schools and their impact on Canadian culture and the Aboriginal peoples themselves) Depending on the responses from the students, my instruction can be adapted to include a more in depth analysis of Residential school impact.

-The videos can also be considered engaging materials as well.

-A quick precursor that this material can be uncomfortable but is still very important would be beneficial to all students as well as the recognition that this is Treaty 6 territory.

Main Procedures/Strategies:

  1. 20 minutes worth of video content looking at the Residential schools themselves as well as their impact. I am showing the students these videos because I am not the authority on this knowledge. I want them to learn from those that can provide for them the context and real life experiences (the truth) that I can only touch on especially because of my inclusion in the dominant culture. Acknowledging this fact is important to show that these are not my stories but that I support the people whose stories they are.

It Matters: The Legacy of Residential School by The WSO Canada (YouTube).- (Approx. 5 mins) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rxGtnKUT0ms

-This resource is a quick blurb about residential schools from another perspective rather than simply “white.” It also looks at the persecution of the Sikh people as well and what they think about the residential schools as well. These resource looks at two stories of oppression and shows that this is not an isolated incident and we need to be better.

– The Impact of Residential Schools on Aboriginal Healthcare | Dawn Tisdale | TEDxComoxValley- (Approx. 10 mins needed) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kMvn_mSsykE

-Ted talks are an excellent resource. This talk looks at a more personalized account of learning about residential school. This will connect with the students because they will be learning about residential schools in the same way as this young woman. Good use of storytelling to get a point across.

Heritage Minutes: Chanie Wenjack-(1 minute)- Written by Joseph Boyden https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v_tcCpKtoU0

New Heritage Minute explores dark history of residential schools-(approx. 2 and a half minutes)  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TK483UHGd7k

-These two resources give a quick glimpse into residential school life and are fairly hard hitting. They take a peek into another residential school survivor’s stories.

2a. 15 minute Discussion-

Why did we watch these videos?

What emotions do these videos foster? Why?

How have the relationships between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people in Canada been broken?

2b. 10 mins- Break into groups of 3 or 4 and then come together to share answers to the class (jigsaw method). Each student has to write in their journal about their group’s discussion. Each group gets a question with a change to discuss before and after the speaker.

How do the stories we have just viewed apply to Three Day Road? What are the similarities? Differences?

How do these stories apply to us as individuals? A class? A society? How have Canadians been denied a proper education about First Nations societies and their historical relationships with Canadians?

How do these stories apply to reconciliation? What is reconciliation? What positive actions can be taken to bring about reconciliation?

-This lesson is a precursor to the Elder talk. I believe that going through this lesson will allow the students a better background to what the Elder is saying and will provide context for the students. Hearing the personalized account of the Residential school will (most likely) foster heavy emotions and this has to be told to the students beforehand.

Day 2-

I would like to make this a place-based lesson and have the kids go listen to an Elder at Wanuskewin Heritage Park or another outside area. In this way, it gets them out of the classroom and more connected to the land and the stories that come from it. This, in my opinion, would be very powerful sitting behind the school with the school in the backdrop. Students would still be outside but in full view of the type of institutions that the Elder/ stories are talking about.

The important thing here is the connection between the learning and listening in connection with the land. This sort of “roots” the learning into the students and gives them a better connection and understanding of the stories we have listened to throughout this mini-unit as they begin to understand how a people that were in connection with the land were ripped from it.

1.      Talk by an Elder (approx. 30 mins). Leading with the presentation of tobacco and the asking if they will share their knowledge with the students on their experiences with Residential Schools. Thanking of the Elder.

2.      Discussion on what the students learnt from the Elder. How does this apply to the questions you are discussing from last class?

3.      Journal entries about what they experienced in the Elder talk (using the same journal format as laid out in the formative assessment section) (approx. 10 mins). I also want the students to write about the 5 W’s and H (Who, What, Where, When, Why, and How) from the Elders talk in preparation for the personalized Eye Witness Account/ report.

Day 3-

1.      10 minutes to discuss any changes the students need to make within their presentation- Group presentations approximately 10 mins each (depending on the amount of groups)

2.      See Closing.

Adaptations/Differentiation:

-Guest Speaker

-Flexible timeframes

-Possible place-based education and/ or field trip opportunity (out of desk/ conventional classroom) Ex. Wanuskewin Heritage Park, Brightwater, the parks and/ or trails along the river that are part of the Meewasin Valley Authority.

-See Unit Adaptations and Differentiation

Closing of lesson: (Last class) (Each day has a mini closing throughout the plan)

Finish KWL chart about what the students have learnt as well as how this ties into the wrap-up project. Use the rest of the time to write in journals.

 

 

 

Lesson Plan Title: What Do We Learn From Treaties?                                                               

Date: Undetermined               Subject: ELA/ History/ Social Studies           Grade:  10       Topic: Three Day Road

Time: 1 class

Materials: Pen, Paper, Electronic Resources, Phones

Stage 1- Desired Results – you may use student friendly language
What do they need to understand, know, and/or able to do?

– The importance of looking to the past to better our future.

-The importance of the Treaties to all members of society.

-The importance of fulfilling Treaty promises to foster better brother-to-brother relationships between all members of society and the world as a whole.

 

Broad Areas of Learning:

Developing Lifelong Learners-

Students who are engaged in constructing and applying English language arts knowledge naturally build a positive disposition towards learning. Throughout their study of English language arts, students gain understandings, skills, and strategies to become more competent and confident language users.

 

Developing a Sense of Self and Community-

To learn English language arts, students need not only to use the English language but also to interact with each other. They use language to interact and to respond effectively with others and to build community.

 

Cross-Curricular Competencies:

Developing Thinking-

Learners construct knowledge to make sense of the world around them. They develop understanding by building on what is already known. This key competency concerns the ability to make sense of information, experiences, and ideas through thinking contextually,

critically, and creatively. The philosophy of learning in English language arts is inquiry-based, and students use their language and thinking skills to explore a range of topics, issues, and themes

Developing Identity and Interdependence-

The ability to act autonomously in an interdependent world requires an awareness of the natural environment, of social and cultural expectations, and of the possibilities for individual and group accomplishments. English Language Arts require students to explore ideas and issues of identity, social responsibility, diversity, sustainability, and personal agency.

Developing Literacies-

Literacies provide many ways, including the use of various language systems and media, to interpret the world and express understanding of it. Literacies involve the evolution of interrelated skills, strategies, and understandings that facilitate an individual’s ability to participate fully and equitably in a variety of roles and contexts – school, home, and local and global communities. To achieve this competency requires developing skills, strategies, and understandings related to various literacies in order to explore and interpret the world and communicate meaning. English language arts requires students to use different literacies, including language literacy, effectively and contextually to represent ideas and understanding in multiple, flexible ways.

Developing Social Responsibility-

This project requires the ability to participate with others in accomplishing shared or common goals. This competency is achieved through using moral reasoning processes, engaging in communitarian thinking and dialogue, and taking action to contribute to learners’ physical, social, and cultural environments. In English language arts, students explore their social responsibility and work toward common goals to improve the lives of others and the natural and constructed worlds.

 

Outcome(s):

CR A10.1-

Comprehend and respond to a variety of visual, oral, print, and multimedia texts that address:

• identity (e.g., Foundational Stories);

• social responsibility (e.g., Destiny and Challenges of Life);

• social action (agency) (e.g., Human Existence).

– View, listen to, read, and respond to First Nations and Métis resources and other texts that reflect diverse personal identities, worldviews, and backgrounds (e.g., appearance, culture, socioeconomic status, ability, age, gender, language, social structures, and decision making).

– Identify connections between self, texts, and culture.

– Develop understanding and interpretations of a variety of texts by drawing upon personal experiences and prior knowledge of texts and language.

– Respond thoughtfully and critically to text providing support from text to justify response.

CR A10.4-

Read, interpret, and draw conclusions about the ideas, information, concepts, and themes presented in a variety of literary (including poems, plays, essays, short stories, novels) and informational (including magazines, newspapers, and on-line information) texts

-Read, comprehend, and explain the human experiences and values reflected in various literary and informational texts created by First Nations, Métis, Saskatchewan, Canadian, and international authors from various cultural communities.

– Demonstrate active reading behaviours including:

• establishing a purpose for reading such as to learn, interpret, and enjoy

• skimming, scanning, and reading closely

• identifying and analyzing explicit and implicit messages, viewpoints, and concepts

• relating understanding of a range of texts to personal experiences, purposes, audiences, and other texts

• constructing images based on text descriptions (Key)

• discussing and analyzing meanings, ideas, language, and literary and informational quality in a range of contemporary and historical texts

CC A10.1

Compose and create a range of visual, multimedia, oral, and written texts that explore:

• identity (e.g., Foundational Stories);

• social responsibility (e.g., Destiny and Challenges of Life);

• social action (agency) (e.g., Human Existence).

-Create spoken, written, and other representations that include:

•        coherence, logical progression, and support for ideas

•        clear patterns of organization

-organize information using appropriate forms (e.g., charts, diagrams, outlines, electronic databases, storyboards)

-draw logical conclusion from information and consider how to best present to identified audience

CC A10.2

Explain and present to a familiar audience the key ideas and events (actual or based on a text studied) through an appropriate combination of charts, diagrams, sound, models, drama, and print.

-Use props, visual aids, graphics, and electronic media to enhance the appeal and accuracy of presentations.

-Analyze, organize, and convert information into different forms (e.g., charts, graphs, drawings).

 

PGP Goals:

1.2       ethical behaviour and the ability to work in a collaborative manner for the good of all learners– Students are put into groups in which they need to work in a collaborative environment. In this way, students that may struggle have a support system that they can use to increase their learning. The inclusion of technology in the classroom helps to bolster student engagement and learning and helps almost all learners succeed.

1.3       a commitment to social justice and the capacity to nurture an inclusive and equitable environment for the empowerment of all learners–  It is important to recognize injustices and failed promises throughout history such as this. The first step to reconciliation is to admit to the mistake and fulfill treaty promises to foster healing between the relationships of all members of society.

2.1       knowledge of Canadian History, especially in reference to Saskatchewan and Western Canada– This lesson is based upon history in relation to Saskatchewan as well as Canada as a whole.

2.3       knowledge of First Nations, Metis and Inuit Culture and History (e.g., Treaties, Residential School, Scrip, and Worldview)- Three Day Road is written by an Aboriginal author and contains FNMI content. Therefore, knowledge of FNMI content is necessary to adequately interpret the picture stories. This lesson is specifically about treaties and the way they affect all members of society.

2.4       ability to use technologies readily, strategically and appropriately– Use of electronic resources such as Padlet, Kahoot, and todaysmeet.com help everyone within the classroom learn and provide a resource for students to look back to.

3.2       the ability to use a wide variety of responsive instructional strategies and methodologies to accommodate learning styles of individual learners and support their growth as social, intellectual, physical and spiritual beings– Use of group work and technology helps to accommodate all learners and, furthermore, helps to ensure the success of all members of the classroom.

 4.2      the ability to incorporate First Nations, Metis, and Inuit knowledge, content and perspective into all teaching areas- FNMI content is in both the book that is being studied as well as the students responses to this content. Furthermore, FNMI knowledge is important in adequately interpreting the treaty lesson.

Stage 2- Assessment
Assessment FOR Learning (formative) Assess the students during the learning to help determine next steps.

The Kahoot/ PowerPoint (depending on school situation) presentation in which we discuss Treaty Trivia is a front loading activity that allows me to see the amount of knowledge my students have in this area. This information allows me to adapt as necessary. In this way, we use something other than the KWL chart to establish what students know beforehand and what they want out know once this activity has been finished. Furthermore, the Kahoot provides a visual for students to see where they as well as their peers are at which can lead to self-assessment and reflection (while boosting self-efficacy if correct and showing that they are not the only ones if incorrect).

Additionally, technology will be used in discussions that can provide instantaneous feedback on student understanding, comprehension, and engagement. These online materials can also be referred back to by both student and teacher and provide additional formative assessment to the verbal discussions.

Question handouts from the Treaty Essential Learning- We Are All Treaty People could be handed out as well in coordination with the readings from this handbook if needed and would serve as another form of formative assessment for the teacher to assess understanding.

Assessment OF Learning (summative) Assess the students after learning to evaluate what they have learned.

This is the middle of the unit on Aboriginal Perspectives. This lesson is leading up to the Eye Witness Account/ Report Assignment as well as the oral presentation. Thus, students create a presentation from their “eye witness” account writing. Students create a picture journey (see picture story assignment) for the students to follow as they tell their story (visual stimuli). This lesson factors into this assignment by looking at the 5 W’s and H that will be the basis for the completion of this mini-unit wrap up assignment.

Who- All members of society with specific looks into Aboriginal culture and perspectives. The characters within Three Day Road.

What- The Aboriginals interaction with the British Crown in signing treaties. The significance of the treaties. What we can learn from the treaties.

Where- Mainly Canada (more specifically Saskatchewan) but the States and world could be touched on as well.

When- From first contact to today.

Why- because it is important to look at historical contexts to better understand ourselves and the society/ environment around us.  …because it allows us to see the historical interactions that influenced the characters within the novel.

How- do treaties help all members of society?  …do we move forward by recognizing the past?

This lesson is the precursor to the Residential Schools series of lessons.

Stage 3- Learning Plan- Motivational/Anticipatory Set

-Begin with an acknowledgement of this being Treaty 6 territory to show students that this land was lived upon before settlers arrived. This will help foster recognition and, thus, a start to reconciliation.

-Begin with a Kahoot/ PowerPoint slides of Treaty Trivia (See Treaty Trivia Sheet) (Kahoot if there is access to tech/ phones within the class. If not, PowerPoint will work)

– Discussion- Do Treaty relations affect all people? If so, How? If not, why do you think so? Create a Padlet/ todaysmeet.com so that students can all comment in real time as well as respond to their peers comments that are on Padlet/ todaysmeet.com in front of them. (Students can then look back on everything that has been said and make any notes etc… out of the comments).

Main Procedures/Strategies:

– Treaty Relations- Overview of the treaties that were signed within Canada with heavier emphasis on the Saskatchewan treaties. Looking at the promises and failed follow through. (Historical Contexts)

– How does the understanding of Treaties enhance or alter our understanding of the play?

– How do lessons learnt from the Treaties tie into the study of this novel? Treaty Essential Learnings –Brother-to-brother relations, Historical Context, Contemporary issues, etc.)

Treaty Essential Learnings- We Are All Treaty People– Pages 15-17- The Treaty Relationship, Pages 18-25 Historical Context

Adaptations/Differentiation:

-Technology inclusion within the discussions for those to reserved to speak to the group as well as for typing/ taking notes

-Notes put on todaysmeet.com can be chosen to last for certain periods of time. Thus, students can access this material outside of class which can help them remember discussion points as well as create notes based on peer input and knowledge.

-The use of online sites such as Padlet/ todaysmeet.com allow for quiet addition while speakers talk which eliminates the need to interrupt.

Closing of lesson:

–          Using Padlet/todaysmeet.com, have students pin their recollected thoughts about worldviews from a previous lesson (Pg. 26-47 of Treaty Essential Learnings- We Are All Treaty People handbook- prior lesson)

–          Using students previous knowledge of worldviews as well as todays lessons on treaties, analyze and discuss the impact that Canadian Treaties could have if implemented on a global scale in small groups. Have students pin their thoughts/ ideas on either Padlet/ todaysmeet.com again for all groups to see.

–          Have a quick discussion on the effectiveness of each group’s ideas/ thoughts.

 

 

 

M. Wilkinson ’16 *Adapted from Understanding by Design (McTighe and Wiggins, 1998)

 

 

Examples of Journal Reflections (done in more of a point form style but could easily be connected to paragraph format.):

Reflection on my Reading and Thinking 1-

-The quick transitions into and out of the memories (flashbacks) could be a little hard to catch onto at first but I believe that by this point students will be pretty adept at picking up these transitions. (Otherwise, this book may be too difficult for them.)

-We feel a building of the tension on the boys’ relationship. We also begin to more clearly see the parallels between Niska and X’s stories. The windigo, bad omens, divining, etc… that are portrayed in two completely different environments. This shows that there is still evil here too and not only in a war torn place.

-It is interesting to begin looking at the origin of E’s last name, Whiskeyjack (Weesageechak) . It is known as a Trickster and so is E. (Coincidence or strategic name placement by the author? #2?). Look at the Trickster story- in what ways does it parallel E’s story? Differ? Shed light on the character as a whole? As an explanation of E’s decent into Windigo status?

“Sadness is at the heart of a wendigo. A sadness so pure that it shriveled the human heart and let something else grow in its place” (Pg. 261).

“We all want to be warriors again.” (Pg. 286).

 

Reflection on my Reading and Thinking 2-

-These chapters are soooo juicy. It is so hard to put the book down. They have such a wonderful build to them. The reader gains a sense of dread as they can see what is coming and are consistently given more evidence to support the reader’s gruesome realizations (wendigo).

-I have big thoughts about these chapters that involve a mask assignment. I want to see what my students think about the dual personality (the good vs the evil) in E. What is Public? What is Private? What lies underneath both of these masks?

-I want to do a debate about this resource on the morality of murder (this chapter). Is it justified? Did E need to do this for their safety? This, I feel, would be a good opening for debates/ discussions. I would then have them look at the morality of the characters themselves within the novel and then about war in general (our participation, its pros vs cons).

“I want to hear. I want to see.”- X’s prayer (Pg. 321)

“We all fight on two fronts, the one facing the enemy, the one facing what we do to the enemy” (Pg. 326)
.

Revised Three Day Road Unit Plan

 

 

Title of Unit

A Journey through Three Day Road by Joseph Boyden  

Grade Level

Grade 10
 

Subject

English Language Arts (ELA)  

Time Frame

Approx. 4 months (the last week being the final project)
 

Developed By

Kashtin Moen
 
Stage 1 – Identify Desired Results

 

Broad Areas of Learning

How are the BAL incorporated into this unit?

 

Lifelong Learners-

Students who are engaged in constructing and applying ELA knowledge naturally build a positive disposition towards learning. Throughout their study of English language arts, students gain understandings, skills, and strategies to become more competent and confident language users.

-This unit will challenge students to incorporate prior knowledge with learned knowledge to fully interact and learn from Joseph Boyden’s Three Day Road. Students will continually be working on improving their ELA skills in reading, writing, and speaking while developing new and implementing old learning strategies. This unit will attempt to unlock and/ or enhance skills the students can carry into their futures in regards to the plethora of knowledge that is contained within stories.

Sense of Self, Community, and Place-

To learn English language arts, students need not only to use the English language but also to interact with each other. Through the English language arts, students learn about themselves, others, and the world. The students use language to define who they are and to explore who they might become. They use language to interact and to respond effectively with others and to build community.

-This unit has many opportunities for students to work individually, in groups, and as part of a team to create a positive learning environment within the classroom. Thus, teamwork and cooperation are some of the backbones of this unit. It is important for students to develop skills in these areas as these skills are highly transferable to everyday situations from work to extracurricular activities. This unit also gives them a peek into Canadian history and Aboriginal ways of knowing while developing their sense of community, mutual respect, and place within a greater context.

Engaged Citizens-

In the English language arts, students learn how language enables them to make a difference in their personal, peer, family, and community lives. Language gives them a sense of agency and an ability to make a difference in their community and the world in which they live.

-This unit will foster interpersonal relationships that translate into constructing positive social interactions within everyday life. Students will learn about a multitude of topics that will give them the confidence in themselves to show intellectual courage and mutual respect in their own lives and communities.

Cross curricular Competencies

How will this unit promote the CCC?

 

Developing Thinking (DT)-

Learners construct knowledge to make sense of the world around them. They develop understanding by building on what is already known. This key competency concerns the ability to make sense of information, experiences, and ideas through thinking contextually, critically, and creatively. The philosophy of learning in English language arts is inquiry-based, and students use their language and thinking skills to explore a range of topics, issues, and themes.

-This unit has plenty of opportunities for students to bring prior knowledge into their work as well as discussions. They have to apply their knowledge to make sense of the ways in which the novel connects to themselves and their world around them. The plethora of different assignments allows students to show off their skills in a number of different ways. Thinking critically, students must analyze the novel and its components and apply it to the unit material. Thinking creatively, students can apply creative solutions to the problems presented within the unit and show their learning in a creative manner. Thinking contextually, students can apply their prior knowledge to situations that arise from the reading material or the discussions and construct answers based upon their “out of classroom” learning. In this way, the unit will foster “real-life” out of classroom learning through actively engaging the students and making them want to learn more about the topics that are being discussed. By asking inquiry-based questions, the students learn to construct an answer on their own by working through the question using all the knowledge in which they have and thinking contextually, critically, and creatively.

Developing Identity and Interdependence (DII)-

The ability to act autonomously in an interdependent world requires an awareness of the natural environment, of social and cultural expectations, and of the possibilities for individual and group accomplishments. It assumes the possession of a positive self-concept and the ability to live in harmony with others and with the natural and constructed worlds. Achieving this competency requires understanding, valuing, and caring for oneself; understanding, valuing, and respecting human diversity and human rights and responsibilities; and understanding and valuing social and environmental interdependence and sustainability. English language arts require students to explore ideas and issues of identity, social responsibility, diversity, sustainability, and personal agency.

-This unit has a whole subsection devoted to the study of identity both within the novel as well as within the individuals studying the novel. In this way, comparisons can be drawn and a deeper understanding of one’s own identity can emerge. This unit also focuses on group work in order to foster interdependence and teamwork to work towards a shared goal of learning and understanding. Through the knowledge gained about oneself within this unit, students can work towards establishing compassion for other members of their community and world and be part of a positive change in our world. This is especially important at a time when hate is so prevalent within our lives through media coverage and violence towards “other” ethnicities.

Developing Literacies (DL)-

Literacies provide many ways, including the use of various language systems and media, to interpret the world and express understanding of it. Literacies involve the evolution of interrelated skills, strategies, and understandings that facilitate an individual’s ability to participate fully and equitably in a variety of roles and contexts – school, home, and local and global communities. To achieve this competency requires developing skills, strategies, and understandings related to various literacies in order to explore and interpret the world and communicate meaning. English language arts requires students to use different literacies, including language literacy, effectively and contextually to represent ideas and understanding in multiple, flexible ways.

This unit looks to develop a range of literacies in order to support and challenge all learners. Reading skills such as skimming vs reading in depth will be looked at to foster different strategies for students to succeed. Communication is an essential tool of humankind and, thus, different strategies to foster communication and communication skill acquisition will be implemented. Literacies involving writing will be explored in depth throughout unit work with different writing methods (essay, poem, monologues, etc…) being used to give the students a comprehensive knowledge of different writing forms.

Developing Social Responsibility (DSR)-

Social responsibility is how people positively contribute to their physical, social, and cultural environments. It requires the ability to participate with others in accomplishing shared or common goals. This competency is achieved through using moral reasoning processes, engaging in communitarian thinking and dialogue, and taking action to contribute to learners’ physical, social, and cultural environments. In English language arts, students explore their social responsibility and work toward common goals to improve the lives of others and the natural and constructed worlds.

-The group work within this unit will require students to positively contribute to their “team” and foster a positive learning environment for all learners. The groups are working towards a common goal of learning and have the ability to take their own learning into their own hands. This unit requires a lot of discussion / communication with a plethora of different sized groups in order to foster positive communication and idea generation. These skills are highly transferable into “real life” scenarios in which students would be facing on a day to day basis because communication has a large influence in our everyday lives. Furthermore, the communication skills gained from active participation within this unit can help students in future endeavors whether that is simply getting a job or being an active spokesperson for environmental issues.

 

Learning Outcomes

What relevant goals will this unit address?

(must come from curriculum; include the designations e.g. IN2.1)

 

I will arrange the outcomes into these categories soon:

Mini-Unit 1- Literary Elements/Perspectives

Mini-Unit 2- Identity and Relationships

Mini-Unit 3- Indigenous Perspectives

Mini-Unit 4- The Effect of War on Canada and its People

 

CR A10.1

Comprehend and respond to a variety of visual, oral, print, and multimedia texts that address:

• identity (e.g., Foundational Stories);

• social responsibility (e.g., Destiny and Challenges of Life);

• social action (agency) (e.g., Human Existence).

– View, listen to, read, and respond to First Nations and Métis resources and other texts that reflect diverse personal identities, worldviews, and backgrounds (e.g., appearance, culture, socioeconomic status, ability, age, gender, language, social structures, and decision making).

– Identify connections between self, texts, and culture

– Respond personally and critically to individuals, events, and ideas presented in a variety of First Nations, Métis, and other Canadian and international texts.

CR A10.3

Listen to, interpret, summarize, and draw conclusions about the ideas and information presented in a variety of literary and informational texts including group discussions, oral readings, interviews, and prepared talks about a topic being studied.

– Listen to and interpret grade-appropriate literary and informational texts created by First Nations, Métis, Saskatchewan, Canadian, and international authors from various cultural communities.

– Engage in reflective, critical, empathic, and appreciative listening.

– Identify the language features and their effects in a range of oral and multimedia texts and describe and analyze their relationships to meaning, purpose, and audience

– Listen respectfully to an invited guest with expertise on the subject, and make notes on the key points as well as the speaker’s purpose, attitude, and organization of ideas for effect.

CR A10.4

Read, interpret, and draw conclusions about the ideas, information, concepts, and themes presented in a variety of literary (including poems, plays, essays, short stories, novels) and informational (including magazines, newspapers, and on-line information) texts

– Read, comprehend, and explain the human experiences and values reflected in various literary and informational texts created by First Nations, Métis, Saskatchewan, Canadian, and international authors from various cultural communities

– Read and interpret critically the main ideas, events, and themes of a variety of literary texts including stories, novels, scripts, poetry, and non-fiction works, and prepare, present, and defend critical responses to what is read.

– Interpret, explain, analyze, and discuss how the literary qualities and the distinctive conventions, structures, and language features of a range of texts suit the topic and purpose.

CC A10.1

Compose and create a range of visual, multimedia, oral, and written texts that explore:

• identity (e.g., Foundational Stories);

• social responsibility (e.g., Destiny and Challenges of Life);

• social action (agency) (e.g., Human Existence).

– Use representing, speaking, and writing to respond to experiences or texts (e.g., a staged dramatic scene, a television episode, a significant personal event).

– Develop and present a project-based inquiry related to a theme or topic of the course:

·      collaborate to determine group knowledge base and to define inquiry or research purpose and parameters

·      draw logical conclusion from information and consider how to best present to identified audience

·      access information using a variety of tools (e.g., electronic networks, libraries, taped oral histories)

CC A10.2

Explain and present to a familiar audience the key ideas and events (actual or based on a text studied) through an appropriate combination of charts, diagrams, sound, models, drama, and print.

– Present information using print and non-print aids to engage and inform a familiar audience.

– Use props, visual aids, graphics, and electronic media to enhance the appeal and accuracy of presentations.

– Use and adapt production techniques and technologies to communicate information, ideas, narrative, or other messages, integrating verbal, visual, and dramatic features to achieve a range of effects.

CC A10.3

Use oral language to express a range of information and ideas in formal (including a prepared talk on a familiar topic, an oral presentation of a passage of prose or poetry, retelling a narrative or recounting an experience or event) and informal (discussion and group work) situations.

– Participate in small- and large-group discussions, observing the courtesies of group discussion, and demonstrate effective group interaction skills and strategies:

·      develop harmony, listen, observe, and respond to and clarify one another’s ideas

·      be respectful but also critical

·      work co-operatively and collaboratively with others in small groups on structured tasks

·      question others, exploring the potential of their contributions, and offer clarification and elaboration upon own ideas when necessary

·      assume some of the work necessary to maintain discussion and advance it (e.g., by summarizing, raising questions, extracting significant points, making connections, setting agenda)

CC A10.4

Compose and create a variety of written literary (including a historical persona essay and a review) and informational (including an observation [eye-witness] report and researched or technical report) texts attending to various elements of discourse (e.g., purpose, speaker, audience, form).

– Write an observation report/eyewitness account (e.g., an incident report, an event report) that:

·         answers 5W and H (who, what, when, where, why, and how) questions for facts about what happened

·         includes thoughts and comments that bring experience to life

·         uses descriptive details (including sights, sounds, tastes, textures, and smells) that show the reader what happened, as if he or she were seeing it firsthand

– Write a historical persona essay (e.g., biographical narrative, response to a historical photo) that:

·         defines important moments in the historic person’s life so essay is well-focused and organized

·         shows understanding of the person, the events, and gathered details about the place and time

·         uses the “I” voice (imagined self to be the person and to be part of these events) in order to get a feel for the experience.

– Write a review (e.g., evaluating a literary work) that:

·         includes thoughtful explanations and specific references to the text itself

·         explores strengths and weaknesses of work and includes passages from text as examples

·         does not retell plot but recognizes theme (general observation about life or human nature) of the text and the relevance of literary techniques (e.g., setting, characters, point of view, basic conflicts, plot development, and use of literary elements such as figurative language and sound).

AR A10.1

Establish and apply criteria to evaluate own and others’ work

– Use feedback to evaluate own effectiveness and set goals in language learning and use

-Evaluate own and others’ contributions to group process and provide support where needed.

– Contribute to the creation of rubrics and other assessment and evaluation tools used to assess visual, oral, written, multimedia, and other products submitted.

 

Enduring Understandings

What understandings about the big ideas are desired? (what you want students to understand & be able to use several years from now)

What misunderstandings are predictable?

Essential Questions

What provocative questions will foster inquiry into the content? (open-ended questions that stimulate thought and inquiry linked to the content of the enduring understanding)

Students will understand that…

-Learning through listening to the stories of others can help better oneself

-What they learn through reading can be applied to better their everyday lives

-The ability to intellectually communication is a key aspect in human life

-Our character defines and determines us, yet there is always a capacity for personal growth

-That decisions have wide spread implications on not only the decision maker but on those around them and the world as a whole as well.

 

 

Related misconceptions…

This is only a story and we can’t learn from reading someone else’s story.

It doesn’t relate to me.

Reading books are only for an English class

Students don’t believe that what they know can apply to intellectual conversation

I do not need to care about Aboriginal issues if I’m not Aboriginal

Content specific….

-How does who we are affect what we see/ or don’t see as well as how we act? Can this be changed or altered?

– How do the values of the individual conflict or not conflict with those of the larger society as a whole?

– What makes an individual decide a course of action and how are those around them affected by those decisions?

– How does placing a piece of literature in the context of our time period affect its meaning and how it is perceived? In its own time?

– How do different worldviews effect and/or reflect throughout our society? Within this novel?

 

FNMI, multicultural, cross-curricular…

– What makes an individual decide a course of action and how are those around them affected by those decisions?

– How does the culture reflected in the writing affect your understanding of it? How does your own culture affect your understanding of it?

-How does the understanding of Treaties enhance or alter our understanding of the play

-In what ways is Three Day Road relevant to our own time and circumstances?

-How have Aboriginal issues evolved or not throughout history?

-In which ways are Indigenous worldviews represented or prevalent within our society? This novel?

Knowledge:

What knowledge will students acquire as a result of this unit?  This content knowledge may come from the indicators, or might also address pre-requisite knowledge that students will need for this unit.

 

Skills

What skills will students acquire as a result of this unit?  List the skills and/or behaviours that students will be able to exhibit as a result of their work in this unit.  These will come from the indicators.

Students will know…

-themselves or an increasing part of themselves

the importance of working as a group (and individually) in reaching academic and learning goals.

-different cultural values and norms and how these interact with one’s own cultural values and norms

-Canadian history

-How authors use literary elements to flesh out their works

-Issues that have befallen Aboriginal peoples both past and present

-How storytelling is an important knowledge keeper and is used as a way to

Students will be able to…

– This unit is attempting to connect and include all levels of Blooms Taxonomy using skills such as questioning, analyzing, and inference (of main ideas and characters) among others.

– Discuss the novel in a variety of manners such as Socratic circle, self-sustained small group work, think-pair-share, debate, and Jigsaw methods.

-Apply prior knowledge to learning material to bolster their own learning.

-Gain a clearer concept of what they previously understood, what they have learnt (within all parts of the unit), and what they still would like to know (based upon the KWL chart).

– Possess the language and ideas to discuss literary concepts as well as the ways in which both European and Aboriginal worldviews are prevalent within the novel

-Organize notes/research/information (from discussions, notes, journals, online and book research materials, etc…)

-Express one’s ideas clearly and in a unique manner

Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence

 

Performance Task

Through what authentic performance task will students demonstrate the desired understandings, knowledge, and skills? (describes the learning activity in “story” form.  Typically, the P.T. describes a scenario or situation that requires students to apply knowledge and skills to demonstrate their understanding in a real life situation. Describe your performance task scenario below)

By what criteria will performances of understanding be judged?

GRASPS Elements of the Performance Task   
G – Goal

What should students accomplish by completing this task?

G- Discover how they have evolved as a person through the undertaking of personal journeys and overcoming obstacles within their lives. Discover how their journey is similar/ different from the characters within the novel Three Day Road.

R- This is an “I” perspective or a third person perspective “he, she, or they”

A- The reader/ consumer/ audience (Mainly teacher but there are several instances where classmates may be involved depending on the project)

S- An in depth exploration of self. How did I become the person who I am today? What has shaped my character and influenced my values and thoughts? An emotional undertaking.

P- Students will create a final project for the full unit on Three Day Road based on a journey within their own lives that they have undertaken. They can choose between a variety of options to complete this task such as creating a photo journey, create a mini play/ monologue, an essay, or they can come to me with an idea.

S- Co-created criteria is hugely important for this project because the students have to put their heart and soul into this journey delving into themselves in a way they may not have previously. Thus, in my opinion, the assessment must meet the students on their grounds to allow them to feel safe rather than “judged.” I believe that in this way the students will feel included, engaged, and safe which will result in a positive learning environment and lead to better work overall.

R – Role

What role (perspective) will your students be taking?

A – Audience

Who is the relevant audience?

 

S – Situation

The context or challenge provided to the student.

P – Product, Performance

What product/performance will the student create?

S – Standards & Criteria for Success

Create the rubric for the Performance Task

 

Attach rubric to Unit Plan- See Three Day Road Assessment Piece

 

Other Evidence

Through what other evidence (work samples, observations, quizzes, tests, journals or other means) will students demonstrate achievement of the desired results? Formative and summative assessments used throughout the unit to arrive at the outcomes.

Student Self-Assessment

How will students reflect upon or self-assess their learning?

Formative-

– During the reading of Three Day Road, students will be writing journals reflecting on what they have read and their understanding of the material for each chapter. Students will be writing about what they believe is important to the story or storytelling within the novel. The students writing in the journals will allow me to see if they have any questions or understand the material within the given chapters. Thus, reading their journals will allow me to adapt my teaching (whether that is going back or using a different teaching method) to better adapt to my student’s needs.

-KWL Chart will help determine where students are and if other information is needed or in need of altering.

– Discussions throughout each mini-unit that demonstrate student comprehension and thought processes. These discussions will be using learning strategies such as Think-Pair-Share, Jigsaw, Socratic Circle, etc. and will incorporate small and large group discussion. Discussions will generally be inquiry-based but may change if a student brings up a topic worth discussing.

-Worksheets based upon these discussions will be used to determine active listening as well as note taking skills (Semi-Summative as well if necessary)

Summative-

-At the end of each mini-unit there is a summative assignment that demonstrates the knowledge that students have absorbed within each mini-unit.

-Once all mini-units are complete, a final assignment (the “My Journey” assignment) will be used as a final summative assessment tool because of its integration of all the knowledge contained within each mini-unit.

-KWL charts at the start and end of each mini-unit will allow students to assess as they go through each mini-unit and will help determine their intellectual growth for both themselves and the teacher. Students will be given the beginning KWL chart at the end so that they can see their progress and determine if they have learnt anything they previously did not know or wanted to know.

-Peer and self-assessments after the discussions to determine what they found valuable, who brought important information to the table, and how they are going to continue their learning with this new found knowledge provided by their classmates.

-Students will take a journal as they read taking down any questions they have, interesting quotes, self-connections, or whatever else they deem important. After the reading of Three Day Road is finished, students will use the notes they have be writing to foster discussion and supplement conversation.

-Student’s journal entries will be a way for them to look back and assess their knowledge of the material and use what they have written and found (such as quotes) within the novel as a way to flesh out their future assignments. It can also allow them to ask for more direction or help within certain chapters or the novel as a whole based upon their assessing of their own understanding through the journal writing process (an avenue of adaptation for myself). In this way, the students can determine whether they need supplementary knowledge/ instruction or simply need to reread to find out information within the novel.

-Group discussions also allow students the ability to self-assess “on the fly” and adapt their knowledge or stance about the material based upon their peers insights.

 

 

Stage 3 – Learning Plan

What teaching and learning experiences will you use to:

  • achieve the desired results identified in Stage 1?
  • equip students to complete the assessment tasks identified in Stage 2?
 
Where are your students headed?  Where have they been?  How will you make sure the students know where they are going? 

What experiences do the learners bring to the unit?  How have the interests of the learners been ascertained?  Have the learners been part of the pre-planning in any way?  What individual needs do you anticipate will need to be addressed?

Learning environment:  Where can this learning best occur?  How can the physical environment be arranged to enhance learning? 

 
Students are now established in high school but are still finding out who they are. Especially because of the big change coming into high school in grade 9. At the start of my English class I like to talk about a few of the outcomes to show the students right off the bat what is expected of them. In this way, there are no surprises and they feel as though they are working towards a goal rather than being in the dark. As this is an ELA class, there are likely to be all sorts of experiences being brought into the classroom.

The experiences of the students is essential throughout this unit, and there is plenty of opportunity for them to share their experiences and try to connect what they’re learning with what they already know about ELA, History/ Social Studies, Health (healthy identities), and Art (for the more artistic projects). Connections can be made to the different worldviews explored within this unit and students can connect this knowledge to their own lived experiences, as well as exposing students to worldviews and experiences that are foreign to their own.

I would also like to dabble with letting students create their own assignments (Pre-planning). An example would be from the media study lesson in which my assignment is a “click-bait” advertisement. If students have a better idea (possible example I am still playing with: create a webpage based on what we believe are our online identities) then I am more than open to discussing and hashing out details with them because they will feel more involved in their learning this way.

The best learning environment will most likely be my classroom but I do love to go outside so I imagine there will be a day or two where we simply go outside to have class. I do eventually want to integrate a canoe trip into the learning to establish a more “living curriculum” as well as get my students interested with the material.

I set my desks in a very specific pattern because I feel as though it enhances discussion and comfort within the room. I try to arrange the desks into a large square (or rectangle). If there are more students in the classroom then two squares, one inside the other, is formed.

 
How will you engage students at the beginning of the unit? (motivational set)  
-Before reading the novel, I will get a paper to create a large visual KWL chart for my students that will be put up in the room (ex. green paper for what I know, Blue for what I’ve learnt, and red for what I want to know). As a class, we will then fill out what we know about the novel, its content, its author, etc… and so on and so forth. Having students come up to write on the large in-class visual chart will foster engagement and provide a visual for all the students to see throughout the reading of the novel. Furthermore, as we make our way through the book, we will continue to fill out this chart and/ or adapt it as we begin learning about the material. This will be used throughout the process for the class’s collective knowledge and can be used as a comparison (formative assessment) for the student’s individual KWL charts.

-The next engaging activity is to have the students draw what they believe is the “three day road.” This can be determined by looking at the novel’s cover, student’s prior knowledge, as well as student’s cultural understandings. We would review these drawings at the conclusion of the novel to see if the students had a better understanding or a different interpretation of the meaning or significance of the “three day road.”

-I believe that these are two effective pre-assessment tools while also successfully contributing to the formative assessment of students.

 
What events will help students experience and explore the enduring understandings and essential questions in the unit?  How will you equip them with needed skills and knowledge?  
# Lesson Title Lesson Activities

 

CCCs Resources  
1  

Diving Into the Road: Joseph Boyden’s Three Day Road

(3 weeks)

 

-Discussion Groups rather than chapter questions to discuss events within the chapter and the author’s use of different Literary Elements (can use their journal entries as well as get information for their journal entries).

-Journals will be discussed after each chapter as well as a few targeted discussion questions (Back of the Three Day Road Novel).

-These journals will be useful for the students throughout the unit because they provide a summary of the chapters as well as a way for students to express their own thoughts about the chapter. This will come in very handy as students move into the more assignment based portions of the unit. Thus, students have the ability to look back and assess their own information that they have built for themselves to more completely answer future questions as well as complete future assignments.

For the Journal: -each Chapter

-1 or 2 quotes that are important (to the chapter, book, characters, or reader)(Page numbers need to be included) and an explanation of its importance (sentence or point form).

-Paragraph about the readers thoughts, connections, and reactions to the chapter (Rosenblatt’s The Reader, The Text, The Poem- What do the words on the page do in the mind of the reader)

-(Minimum 5) Point form notes on what the reader has learnt about the characters, setting, time period, major events, etc…

DT, DSR, DS Three Day Road Novel

-Discussion Targets

-Student Journals

 

Rosenblatt’s The Reader, The Text, The Poem

 
2 The End is only the Beginning

 

 

Discuss symbolism within the novel as well as symbolism as a tool for communication (within the Treaties especially)

Treaty Essential Learnings- We Are All Treaty People handbook- Pages 48-50

-Show students Paskwa’s Pictograph (Pg. 50)

-Show students my creation (picture story of Elijah’s decent into the Wendigo)

 

 

 

Create a picture story of the novel Three Day Road.

See Three Day Road Lesson Plan: Picture Story Creation

DT, DL, DSR -Electronic Resources

-Paper

-Pen

Treaty Essential Learnings- We Are All Treaty People handbook

-My picture story

 
3 Literary Analysis

(3 classes)

KWL Chart- Literary Elements

Look at the literary elements of the novel (ex. imagery, foreshadowing, allusion, simile etc.). This will be done interspersed throughout the reading of the novel.

A small Socratic circle will be done in preparation for the larger/ longer circle. Here, a list of questions will be created in preparation for the big circle to aid in material for the next class. (Socratic Circle-ception- This Socratic Circle will be about what makes a Socratic Circle successful as well as provide ideas to bring to the next days planned Socratic Circle.)

DL, DT -Novel

-Literary Elements list

-Pen

-Paper

 
4 Socratic Circle

(1 Class)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Socratic Circle Follow up (3 classes)

-A Socratic Circle on how the literary elements allow us better insight into the characters and their journeys within the novel.

-5 minutes is dedicated to students preparing last minute information gathering/ note taking.

-2 minutes to fully set up into the Socratic Circle.

-32 minutes (two 15 minute sections with a 2 minute break in between) for the Socratic Circle

-Discussion based off of the circles and finishing up any pressing issues or necessary questions or acknowledgements. 5 mins

-Approx. 15 minutes to write a minimum three sentence review of the Socratic circle process (can be 2 likes and a dislike or 2 dislikes and a like but both must be represented)

 

Based upon all the information gathered up until this point, students will write a review of the novel that expresses and justifies an opinion about the text without summarizing the plot. What did you like? Not Like?

KWL Chart Revision

DT, DL, DSR -List of previous questions

-Paper

-Pen

 

 
5  

Who Are We?

(2 classes)

KWL Chart- Identity

What is Identity?

What Shapes Identity?

Can Identity change or is it static?

-Write about something that you believe shapes your identity. How does it shape you? Why did you choose this particular thing/ event?

Create a poem about identity. Look at Poems about Identity- ex. Gregory Scofield’s They Taught Her

DT, DII -Pen

-Paper

– Gregory Scofield’s They Taught Her

 
6 You… says the Media

 

Media Studies

-How does the media shape our identities?

-Media awareness- stereotypes perpetuated by the media (Sexism, racializing, violence)

-What is the difference between fact and fiction? How can one tell online?

 

Create a one page “click-bait” advertisement about yourself– Students look at “click-bait” advertisements on the internet and create a one page advertisement story  (includes a good eye-catching caption picture) about themselves

DT, DII, DSR, DL -Pen

-Paper

-Media Studies Handout

-Electronic resources

 
7  

Identity Unmasked

(3 classes)

 

Assignment-Create a mask based on the way you see yourself

-Create a mask based on how you believe people see you

-Interview others to ask what they believe your identity is (how they portray you) and create a mask based on these traits/ viewpoints.

-Using these three representations, write about the differences and similarities, why you believe there are differences, and what might account for these differences.

Discussion -How does this information shape identity? Change identity?

Do our peers affect identity? Do they change our identity?

KWL Chart Revision

DT,DII,DL, DSR -Pen

-Paper

-(Possible mask sheet/ paper macheing 1 mask)

 
8 Culture Club

 

 

KWL Chart- Culture and FNMI perspectives

-Lesson on Worldviews- Pages 26-47 of Treaty Essential Learnings- We Are All Treaty People handbook. – looking at the different worldviews and the way they apply and affect the story within Three Day Road as well as our world/ society as a whole.

-How does the culture (and worldviews) reflected in the writing affect your understanding of it? How does your own culture affect your understanding of it?

-Aboriginal ways of knowing- medicine wheel- looking at the way the character’s stories fall into the four categories and the ways in which the characters are “sick” (or not fulfilling all aspects of the medicine wheels ideologies)

-How do aboriginal ways of knowing affect the novel? The characters? Our own viewpoints?

-In what ways is Three Day Road relevant to our own time and circumstances?

DL, DSR, DII, DT -Pen

-Paper

-Medicine Wheel

Treaty Essential Learnings- We Are All Treaty People handbook

 
9 You’re in for a Treat-y -How does the understanding of Treaties enhance or alter our understanding of the play?

-Treaty Relations- Overview of the treaties that were signed within Canada with heavier emphasis on the Saskatchewan treaties. Looking at the promises and failed follow through.

– Do Treaty relations affect all people? If so, How? If not, why do you think so?

– How do lessons learnt from the Treaties tie into the study of this novel? Treaty Essential Learnings –Brother-to-brother relations, Historical Context, Contemporary issues, etc.)

-Analyze the impact that Canadian Treaties could have if implemented on a global scale.

Treaty Essential Learnings- We Are All Treaty People– Pages 15-17- The Treaty Relationship

DT, DII, DSR -Treaty Handouts

-Office of the Treaty Commissioner handouts

 
10 Residential Schools- destroying  knowledge and culture

 

 

-What are residential schools? What was their effect in the play? In real life?

-Look at books from the reading for reconciliation initiative. Ex. Born with a Tooth by Joseph Boyden, No Time to Say Goodbye: Children’s Stories of Kuper Island Residential School by

Sylvia Olsen, Rita Morris & Ann Sam, Residential Schools: With the Words & Images of Survivors by Larry Oskiniko, Kookum’s Red Shoes by Peter Eyvindson. These, among many others, are useful to see the plethora of injustices that were imposed upon the First Nations people.

(Can get these resources from Saskatoon Public Library)

-How did the main characters fight against the residential school teachings to combat the loss of their culture? How have survivors combated the loss of culture? Is this a loss of Identity?

 

-I would really like to get an Elder to come and speak with my class about the horrors and pain that the residential schools wrought on an entire people. I feel as though this is an invaluable experience and the full emotional impact will be lost if I cannot find a speaker. Nevertheless, if one is not available this lesson will still commence.

 

Assignment- will be an Eye Witness Account/ report that answers the 5W’s and H for facts about what happened and uses descriptive details. The Elder would have used descriptive details in his/her account of the events.

Oral and symbolic tradition mini-unit wrap up. Students present their story orally to the class touching on the above details. Thus, students create a presentation from their “eye witness” account writing. Students create a picture journey (see picture story assignment) for the students to follow as they tell their story (visual stimuli).

KWL Chart Revision

DT, DSR, DII -Pen

-Paper

No Time to Say Goodbye: Children’s Stories of Kuper Island Residential School

– Born with a Tooth

Residential Schools: With the Words & Images of Survivors

Kookum’s Red Shoes

 
11

 

Moving Forward to History

 

 

KWL Chart- The Great War and its Effect on Canadian Peoples

-Discussion on the Great War. Historical context- Beginnings, major players, toll (body, mind, emotions). Canadian implications- How did it affect our people? Was everyone affected? How were gender roles defined before the war? After? Effects on society.

– WE ANSWERED THE CALL by The Office of the Treaty Commissioner- A History of the Saskatchewan First Nations’ Contribution to Canada’s Freedom and Democracy- DVD on First Nations involvement in the war as well as Frist Nations Veterans stories.

 

-How was the war portrayed in the novel?

-What significance did the war have in the novel? What significance did it have for the main characters?

DT, DSR, DII -Pen

-Paper

-We Answered The Call

 
12

 

The Rest is History

(3 classes)

 

Assignment- Students will write a Historical Persona Essay that shows understanding of the person, events, and the gathered details about the place and the time.

 

KWL Chart Revision

DL, DT -Computers (research resources)

-Pen

-Paper

 
13 Final Project

(1 Week)

“My Journey”Students will create a final project for the end of the unit (with full integration of each of the mini-units) on Three Day Road based on a journey within their own lives that they have undertaken.

-They can choose between a variety of options to complete this task such as creating a photo journey, create a mini play/ monologue, an essay, or they can come to me with an idea. Rubric will be co-created with the students.

DT, DII, DL, DSR -Pen

-Paper

 
  Assess and Reflect (Stage 4)
  Considerations Comments
  Required Areas of Study:

 Is there alignment between outcomes, performance assessment and learning experiences?

I believe so but then again I am bias. I believe I have created a fairly comprehensive novel study that effectively targets the major outcomes and necessary elements of the English A 10 Curriculum. My next order of business in regards to this unit is to do crossover work with the History/ Social Studies teacher in the war unit as well as in the Treaties discussions/ lessons. The next step after that is to go to the PAA teacher and discuss the inclusion of creating a canoe as a class for a large project. After this, I want to contact the Phys. Ed teacher and have the students go canoeing (hopefully in their newly made one) to simulate Niska and X’s trip down the river. I believe this would integrate “living curriculum” really well as well as implement place-based-learning in my classroom. Furthermore, it would be easier to get funding for this excursion if it includes other classes and teachers while simultaneously hitting on several objectives for those teachers classrooms as well. All of this together would create an awesome holistic learning experience for my students that would hugely benefit (and motivate) them to want to continue learning in English Language Arts.
  Adaptive Dimension:

Have I made purposeful adjustments to the curriculum content (not outcomes), instructional practices, and/or the learning environment to meet the learning needs and diversities of all my students?

For struggling students:

-Work with the EA’s, LAT’s, specialists (ex. hearing) in the room (if there are any) to get a better idea of the needs of any student with exceptionalities.

-Group work to help lighten their load

-Lots of discussion that they have the opportunity to listen to and create understanding from others

-Difficulty options for projects (can go as easy or hard as they need while still maintaining the projects integrity) (Ex. see challenge example below)

-Different options for the final project that will allow them to choose what they are most comfortable doing.

-Learning using collaborative group work allows struggling students to only have to know a part of a larger concept in order to contribute to the collective knowledge of the group. Thus, the concepts do not seem as overwhelming and the student(s) can learn the major concepts from one another. (Lightening the intellectual load)

-Students with reading/writing difficulties: I will provide notes with essential information for the students (note handouts) or adapt to an easier format for these students (ex. students can type, have fill-in-the-blank versions of the notes, or have a scribe).

-Exceptional students with focus/attention issues: There is lots of collaborative group work within my unit in order to get them out of their desks and discussing with their peers. Thus, more active engagement in the lessons will allow them to move more than simply sit still and listen.

-Students with Autism- I will put an outline/ schedule for the day so that they can easily track/plan their day as well as see the transitions throughout the day. I would also further warn them of any potential changes throughout the day such as fire drills or guest speakers.

-For EAL students: The novel itself has Cree words within it showing that other languages are important in understanding culture as well as contexts within the novel. I think it is important to show that you as the teacher are trying to connect with these students and simply attempting to learn a word or two within their language shows that you are willing to learn and include who they are outside of a “non-English” speaker. I also believe that acknowledging their success in successfully speaking English is more important than correcting their mistakes. I always tell my students that “I bet you know more words in English than I do in ____” (ex. Tagalog, Cree, Turkish, etc…). Thus, acknowledging that they are accomplishing something is highly important not only to motivation and engagement but to self-efficacy as well. On a more specific note, providing definitions of larger words within the notes can be beneficial for language learners especially if given beforehand so the students can prepare their understanding. Furthermore, if they need, I am more than willing to give them more time to do assignments because of the added task of learning the language on top of learning the assignment. Everything above can also be given in advance to the EAL teachers so that they can do the same work in their class as we are doing in class so that a harmony is created.

For students who need a challenge:

– Up the ante for them. Make them delve deeper into the project. (Ex. rather than talk about a trip to the store for their picture journey, these students have to talk about a complex topic such as overcoming claustrophobia)

-Pair the gifted students with a struggling student (This needs to be monitored closely to ensure beneficial learning for both students).  If the gifted student has a strong grasp on the course concepts, paring them with a struggling student to explain the concept can help guide learning for both students. Yet, if this pairing isn’t helping either student, I would pair the gifted students with other high-achieving students that could stimulate them intellectually.

-The emphasis on Bloom’s Taxonomy highest order function, create, allows gifted students the freedom of choice to create a project that is within their higher creative levels.

-If student(s) are comfortable and have adequate time to prepare, have them teach/ co-teach one of the days on a topic that they choose. Have them integrate it into the planned lessons but from the student’s point of view.

  Instructional Approaches:

Do I use a variety of teacher directed and student centered instructional approaches?

Yes. Think-Pair-Share, Jigsaw, Socratic Circle. Class discussion. Chunking. Lecture style.

Using a plethora of group work activities, students had the opportunity to work through ideas and concepts collectively instead of individually. In this way, I attempt to maintain better engagement with the material as well as create a more active classroom environment. Furthermore, students have the ability to teach and learn from one another through experiences, discussions, assignments, and reflections/journals.

 

  Resource Based Learning:

 Do the students have access to various resources on an ongoing basis?

They can use computers, ipads, and/ or, if allowed, phones to look up necessary data. As of right now, I need to incorporate more technology into my unit. I am including a media studies lesson within my identity unit that will be heavily electronically based.

 

  FNM/I Content and Perspectives/Gender Equity/Multicultural Education:

Have I nurtured and promoted diversity while honoring each child’s identity?

I believe that I have done a fairly good job of incorporating FNMI content especially since I have a full mini-unit devoted to this. Furthermore, my identity unit is tailored to the individual but also looks at everything that makes and influences an individual to become who they are. Thus, FNMI content will be almost inevitably included as students learn more about each worldview and how we are all treaty people. One of the most important practices in my room is promoting inclusion and, thus, I think that fostering positive discussion about these topics alleviates their stigma.

 

 

Three Day Road Outcome Rubric

Name: ________________________

Grade: __________________________

Outcome Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4
L M H L M H L M H L M H
CC A10.1 : Compose and create a range of     visual , multimedia , oral , and written texts that explore:

  • identity (e.g., Foundational Stories);
  • social responsibility (e.g., Destiny and Challenges of Life); and
  • social action (agency) (e.g., Human Existence).
Beginning Progressing Use representing, speaking, and writing to respond to experiences or texts (e.g., a staged dramatic scene, a television episode, a significant personal event). Established
CR A10.4 : Read, interpret, and draw conclusions about the ideas, information,        concepts, and themes presented in a variety of literary (including poems, plays, essays, short stories, novels) and informational (including magazines, newspapers, and on-line information) texts. Beginning Progressing Read, comprehend, and explain the human experiences and values reflected in various literary and informational texts created by First Nations, Métis, Saskatchewan, Canadian, and international authors from various cultural communities. Established
CC A10.3 : Use oral language to express a

range of information and ideas in formal

(including a prepared talk on a familiar topic, an oral presentation of a passage of prose or poetry, and a retelling of a narrative or a recounting of an experience or event) and informal (discussion and group work) situations.

Beginning Progressing Recognize and adjust oral presentation elements effectively (i.e., articulation, pronunciation, volume, tempo, pitch, stress, gestures, eye contact, facial expression, and poise) in keeping with purpose, audience needs, and individual cultural and linguistic background. Established

Comments:

 

My Comments about the rubric:

  • This is my preliminary rubric and I will be adapting it based upon discussion with my class. Another way that I may go is towards the style of the dance rubric that I will provide as well.
  • This was constructed using the Saskatchewan Curriculum Builder Add-On to Google Chrome.
  • The highlighted text is based on the cognitive domain material.

 

 

Assessment OF Learning (summative) Assess the students after learning to evaluate what they have learned.

-How the individual topics as well as the topics as a whole (cumulative) are portrayed within the students writing about their own personal journey.

-The extent of detail in which the student uses to create their final project will be assessed.

-The level of inclusion of the topics Literary Elements/Perspectives, Identity and Relationships, The Effect of War on Canada and its People, and Indigenous Perspectives will be assessed.

 

This is for my final project based on the summative learning from the Three Day Road unit as a whole. This project consists of students writing/ sharing a journey that they have undertaken within their lives. It is a very open project that can be easily narrowed down to something as simple as the time they got a flat tire heading to Grandma’s house to advanced such as their journey into or out of friendships/ hardships or whatever else they may like to do. Furthermore, this project has a wide spread of options to complete this task such as writing an essay, creating a picture book, creating a scrapbook, or creating a small play to name a few. I am also very open to students coming up with their own ideas that, of course, must be discussed with me.

 

The reason that the majority of the rubric is not filled out is because I want to co-construct criteria with my students. I want them to help create the guidelines of their assessment so that they are more invested in reaching their co-constructed goals. In this way, I hope to foster engagement in not only the project itself but in all aspects of the final project creation. I chose to only fill in the “meeting” category (level 3) with an indicator of the affiliated outcomes because I want the students to create the material that goes into that category. The indicators within the level 3 category are simply guidelines to focus student thought. Additionally, I only want to fill out the higher categories (level 3/4) with co-created criteria because I want students to see what they have to do to achieve this level rather than what isn’t meeting expectation (focus on the positive rather than the negative).

 

This rubric will change depending on what projects the students do as well as the criteria that they feel they should be assessed on.

 

 

KWL Chart (with summarization section)

Thoughts Organizer:

 

Name: ____________________­____                                 Class: ___________________________

Summarize:

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

What I learned:

1.

 

2.

 

3.

 

4.

 

5.

 

6.

What I want to know:

1.

 

2.

 

3.

 

4.

 

5.

 

6.

What I already know:

1.

 

2.

 

3.

 

4.

 

5.

 

6.

 

­­

I checked-

Before reading:               □  Headings and subheadings        

                                              □  Italic, bold, and underlined word

                                              □  Pictures, tables, and graphs   

                                              □  Questions or other key information

 

After previewing:            □  Made Predictions

 

After reading:                    □  Discussed with a partner             □  Reviewed Predictions

                                                 □  Rechecked all points from before reading

 

 

 

Lesson Plan Title: Picture Story Creation                                                                                      

Date: Undetermined               Subject: ELA            Grade:  10       Topic: Three Day Road

Time: 3 hrs. (3 Classes) – Possibly 2 depending on speed of completion

Materials: Pen, Paper, Markers, Camera (possible), Electronic Resources

Stage 1- Desired Results – you may use student friendly language
What do they need to understand, know, and/or able to do?

-How a picture story is a synthesis of the main ideas/ plot points within the story and can be used for clarification and quick recollection of material.

-How “using your own words” to describe the story (using the picture story) shows a fuller comprehension of the material.

 

Broad Areas of Learning:

Developing Lifelong Learners-

Students who are engaged in constructing and applying English language arts knowledge naturally build a positive disposition towards learning. Throughout their study of English language arts, students gain understandings, skills, and strategies to become more competent and confident language users.

 

Developing a Sense of Self and Community-

To learn English language arts, students need not only to use the English language but also to interact with each other. They use language to interact and to respond effectively with others and to build community.

 

Cross-Curricular Competencies:

Developing Thinking-

Learners construct knowledge to make sense of the world around them. They develop understanding by building on what is already known. This key competency concerns the ability to make sense of information, experiences, and ideas through thinking contextually,

critically, and creatively. The philosophy of learning in English language arts is inquiry-based, and students use their language and thinking skills to explore a range of topics, issues, and themes

Developing Identity and Interdependence-

The ability to act autonomously in an interdependent world requires an awareness of the natural environment, of social and cultural expectations, and of the possibilities for individual and group accomplishments. English Language Arts require students to explore ideas and issues of identity, social responsibility, diversity, sustainability, and personal agency.

Developing Literacies-

Literacies provide many ways, including the use of various language systems and media, to interpret the world and express understanding of it. Literacies involve the evolution of interrelated skills, strategies, and understandings that facilitate an individual’s ability to participate fully and equitably in a variety of roles and contexts – school, home, and local and global communities. To achieve this competency requires developing skills, strategies, and understandings related to various literacies in order to explore and interpret the world and communicate meaning. English language arts requires students to use different literacies, including language literacy, effectively and contextually to represent ideas and understanding in multiple, flexible ways.

Developing Social Responsibility-

This project requires the ability to participate with others in accomplishing shared or common goals. This competency is achieved through using moral reasoning processes, engaging in communitarian thinking and dialogue, and taking action to contribute to learners’ physical, social, and cultural environments. In English language arts, students explore their social responsibility and work toward common goals to improve the lives of others and the natural and constructed worlds.

 

Outcome(s):

CR A10.1-

Comprehend and respond to a variety of visual, oral, print, and multimedia texts that address:

• identity (e.g., Foundational Stories);

• social responsibility (e.g., Destiny and Challenges of Life);

• social action (agency) (e.g., Human Existence).

– View, listen to, read, and respond to First Nations and Métis resources and other texts that reflect diverse personal identities, worldviews, and backgrounds (e.g., appearance, culture, socioeconomic status, ability, age, gender, language, social structures, and decision making).

– Identify connections between self, texts, and culture.

– Develop understanding and interpretations of a variety of texts by drawing upon personal experiences and prior knowledge of texts and language.

– Respond thoughtfully and critically to text providing support from text to justify response.

CR A10.4-

Read, interpret, and draw conclusions about the ideas, information, concepts, and themes presented in a variety of literary (including poems, plays, essays, short stories, novels) and informational (including magazines, newspapers, and on-line information) texts

-Read, comprehend, and explain the human experiences and values reflected in various literary and informational texts created by First Nations, Métis, Saskatchewan, Canadian, and international authors from various cultural communities.

– Demonstrate active reading behaviours including:

• establishing a purpose for reading such as to learn, interpret, and enjoy

• skimming, scanning, and reading closely

• identifying and analyzing explicit and implicit messages, viewpoints, and concepts

• relating understanding of a range of texts to personal experiences, purposes, audiences, and other texts

• constructing images based on text descriptions (Key)

• discussing and analyzing meanings, ideas, language, and literary and informational quality in a range of contemporary and historical texts

CC A10.1

Compose and create a range of visual, multimedia, oral, and written texts that explore:

• identity (e.g., Foundational Stories);

• social responsibility (e.g., Destiny and Challenges of Life);

• social action (agency) (e.g., Human Existence).

-Create spoken, written, and other representations that include:

•        coherence, logical progression, and support for ideas

•        clear patterns of organization

-organize information using appropriate forms (e.g., charts, diagrams, outlines, electronic databases, storyboards)

-draw logical conclusion from information and consider how to best present to identified audience

CC A10.2

Explain and present to a familiar audience the key ideas and events (actual or based on a text studied) through an appropriate combination of charts, diagrams, sound, models, drama, and print.

-Use props, visual aids, graphics, and electronic media to enhance the appeal and accuracy of presentations.

-Analyze, organize, and convert information into different forms (e.g., charts, graphs, drawings).

 

PGP Goals:

1.2       ethical behaviour and the ability to work in a collaborative manner for the good of all learners– Students are put into groups in which they need to work in a collaborative environment. In this way, students that may struggle have a support system that they can use to increase their learning.

2.3       knowledge of First Nations, Metis and Inuit Culture and History (e.g., Treaties, Residential School, Scrip, and Worldview)- Three Day Road is written by an Aboriginal author and contains FNMI content. Therefore, knowledge of FNMI content is necessary to adequately interpret the picture stories.

2.4       ability to use technologies readily, strategically and appropriately– Use of electronic resources such as PowerPoint and image searches help everyone within the classroom.

3.2       the ability to use a wide variety of responsive instructional strategies and methodologies to accommodate learning styles of individual learners and support their growth as social, intellectual, physical and spiritual beings– Use of group work as well as the Jigsaw Teaching strategy helps to accommodate all learners and, furthermore, helps to ensure the success of all members of the classroom.

 4.2      the ability to incorporate First Nations, Metis, and Inuit knowledge, content and perspective into all teaching areas- FNMI content is in both the book that is being studied as well as the students responses to this content. Furthermore, FNMI knowledge is important in adequately interpreting the picture stories.

4.3       the capacity to engage in program planning to shape ‘lived curriculum’ that brings learner needs, subject matter, and contextual variables together in developmentally appropriate, culturally responsive and meaningful ways-

Stage 2- Assessment
Assessment FOR Learning (formative) Assess the students during the learning to help determine next steps. 

Students understanding/ comprehension will be shown throughout the reading of Three Day Road by Joseph Boyden. Additionally, checkups during the creation process to make sure students are on the right track will be done. Student’s choice of pictures will also dictate if they understand the text. Ex. A person paddling a canoe does not fit with Xavier’s story after the war because he is having withdrawal symptoms in the bottom of a canoe. Therefore, if a group chooses this picture for Xavier then they may need more help or clarification.

 

Assessment OF Learning (summative) Assess the students after learning to evaluate what they have learned.

At the end of the lessons, students will hand in their collaborative work on their picture story for their designated chapters. Students will come together once they are finished in a Jigsaw teaching strategy to share their chapter picture story with the group. Thus, the class as a whole creates a full picture journey of Three Day Road.

Marking will be based upon: coherence, accuracy, understanding (of audience), and detail. The extent of which will be co-created with my students and, thus, a rubric will be created based upon these topics linked into the outcomes and indicators within the curriculum.

Stage 3- Learning Plan- Motivational/Anticipatory Set

–          Show PowerPoint of my picture journey of getting to school without using words (1st half). Students have to guess what happened based on the pictures (Easy).

–          The second half is a picture journey of a scene from How To Train Your Dragon. It is depicting the first arena battle when they are learning to fight dragons to save their village. This one is a little bit more difficult because it will not be spelt out for them (Hard).

–          Show the students my picture of Elijah turning into the Wendigo. Discuss how this shows a journey.

–          Discuss the ways in which Aboriginal cultures used symbolism as a form of communication and understanding (within the Treaties especially). Show the students Paskwa’s Pictograph. Treaty Essential Learnings- We Are All Treaty People handbook- Pages 48-50

–           Discuss symbolism within the novel

–          Discuss with the students how a picture journey can enhance understanding and aid in recollection.

Main Procedures/Strategies:

–          Students are broken into small groups to work on creating a picture story of a few (depending on group size) chapters from Three Day Road.

-Approximately 3-5 students per group that will take approximately 3-5 chapters each.

-A minimum of 5 and a maximum of 15 pictures per chapter is necessary (exceptions based on chapter sizes may be necessary)

-Each group has to share why they chose the pictures they did and what significance it has to the chapter and to the story as a whole.

Adaptations/Differentiation:

-Can draw, take photos, or use electronic resources to find images to use.

-Group work allows students to collaborate and help students that may otherwise struggle. (See Unit Plan Adaptations and Differentiation section)

Closing of lesson: (Last class)

–          Accumulate all the picture stories into one cohesive whole for the students to use as a resource throughout the unit. (Jigsaw Teaching Strategy)

–          Discuss how this resource can benefit the students throughout the rest of the unit on Three Day Road (reference, recollection, future assignment example)

 


Lesson Plan Title
: Residential Schools                                                                                  

Date: Undetermined               Subject: ELA/ Social Studies            Grade:  10       Topic: Three Day Road/ Residential Schools

Time: 3 classes

Materials: Pen, Paper, Ears

Stage 1- Desired Results – you may use student friendly language
What do they need to understand, know, and/or able to do?

– Residential school was developed to try to teach First Nation’s children to leave their cultural ways for that of the newcomers.

-Residential school was extremely difficult for First Nation’s children because they had to leave their families and communities for extended periods to go away to school and experienced horrible conditions within the schools including physical, mental, and sexual abuse.

-Residential school affects First Nations people today because of the ongoing intergenerational trauma that was a direct result of the conditions and abuses endured by the First Nations people

-All Canadians can help the healing process by learning about and understanding the truths about the history and legacy of Indian Residential Schools

-Stories are a powerful device of healing, persuasion, information, and engagement

 

Broad Areas of Learning:

Developing Lifelong Learners-

Students who are engaged in constructing and applying English language arts knowledge naturally build a positive disposition towards learning. Throughout their study of English language arts, students gain understandings, skills, and strategies to become more competent and confident language users.

 

Developing a Sense of Self and Community-

To learn English language arts, students need not only to use the English language but also to interact with each other. They use language to interact and to respond effectively with others and to build community.

 

Engaged Citizens-

In the English language arts, students learn how language enables them to make a difference in their personal, peer, family, and community lives. Language gives them a sense of agency and an ability to make a difference in their community and the world in which they live.

 

Cross-Curricular Competencies:

Developing Thinking-

Learners construct knowledge to make sense of the world around them. They develop understanding by building on what is already known. This key competency concerns the ability to make sense of information, experiences, and ideas through thinking contextually,

critically, and creatively. The philosophy of learning in English language arts is inquiry-based, and students use their language and thinking skills to explore a range of topics, issues, and themes

Developing Identity and Interdependence-

The ability to act autonomously in an interdependent world requires an awareness of the natural environment, of social and cultural expectations, and of the possibilities for individual and group accomplishments. English Language Arts require students to explore ideas and issues of identity, social responsibility, diversity, sustainability, and personal agency.

Developing Literacies-

Literacies provide many ways, including the use of various language systems and media, to interpret the world and express understanding of it. Literacies involve the evolution of interrelated skills, strategies, and understandings that facilitate an individual’s ability to participate fully and equitably in a variety of roles and contexts – school, home, and local and global communities. To achieve this competency requires developing skills, strategies, and understandings related to various literacies in order to explore and interpret the world and communicate meaning. English language arts requires students to use different literacies, including language literacy, effectively and contextually to represent ideas and understanding in multiple, flexible ways.

Developing Social Responsibility-

This project requires the ability to participate with others in accomplishing shared or common goals. This competency is achieved through using moral reasoning processes, engaging in communitarian thinking and dialogue, and taking action to contribute to learners’ physical, social, and cultural environments. In English language arts, students explore their social responsibility and work toward common goals to improve the lives of others and the natural and constructed worlds.

 

Outcome(s):

CR A10.1-

Comprehend and respond to a variety of visual, oral, print, and multimedia texts that address:

• identity (e.g., Foundational Stories);

• social responsibility (e.g., Destiny and Challenges of Life);

• social action (agency) (e.g., Human Existence).

– View, listen to, read, and respond to First Nations and Métis resources and other texts that reflect diverse personal identities, worldviews, and backgrounds (e.g., appearance, culture, socioeconomic status, ability, age, gender, language, social structures, and decision making).

– Identify connections between self, texts, and culture.

– Develop understanding and interpretations of a variety of texts by drawing upon personal experiences and prior knowledge of texts and language.

– Respond thoughtfully and critically to text providing support from text to justify response.

CR A10.4-

Read, interpret, and draw conclusions about the ideas, information, concepts, and themes presented in a variety of literary (including poems, plays, essays, short stories, novels) and informational (including magazines, newspapers, and on-line information) texts

-Read, comprehend, and explain the human experiences and values reflected in various literary and informational texts created by First Nations, Métis, Saskatchewan, Canadian, and international authors from various cultural communities.

– Demonstrate active reading behaviours including:

• establishing a purpose for reading such as to learn, interpret, and enjoy

• skimming, scanning, and reading closely

• identifying and analyzing explicit and implicit messages, viewpoints, and concepts

• relating understanding of a range of texts to personal experiences, purposes, audiences, and other texts

• constructing images based on text descriptions (Key)

• discussing and analyzing meanings, ideas, language, and literary and informational quality in a range of contemporary and historical texts

CC A10.1

Compose and create a range of visual, multimedia, oral, and written texts that explore:

• identity (e.g., Foundational Stories);

• social responsibility (e.g., Destiny and Challenges of Life);

• social action (agency) (e.g., Human Existence).

-Create spoken, written, and other representations that include:

•        coherence, logical progression, and support for ideas

•        clear patterns of organization

-organize information using appropriate forms (e.g., charts, diagrams, outlines, electronic databases, storyboards)

-draw logical conclusion from information and consider how to best present to identified audience

CC A10.2

Explain and present to a familiar audience the key ideas and events (actual or based on a text studied) through an appropriate combination of charts, diagrams, sound, models, drama, and print.

-Use props, visual aids, graphics, and electronic media to enhance the appeal and accuracy of presentations.

-Analyze, organize, and convert information into different forms (e.g., charts, graphs, drawings).

 

PGP Goals:

1.2       ethical behaviour and the ability to work in a collaborative manner for the good of all learners– Students are put into groups in which they need to work in a collaborative environment. In this way, students that may struggle have a support system that they can use to increase their learning and comfort.

2.3       knowledge of First Nations, Metis and Inuit Culture and History (e.g., Treaties, Residential School, Scrip, and Worldview)- Three Day Road is written by an Aboriginal author and contains FNMI content. Therefore, knowledge of FNMI content is essential to both the novel as well as the lesson material (residential schools). This is a direct inclusion of FNMI content.

2.4       ability to use technologies readily, strategically and appropriately– Use of electronic resources such as PowerPoint and image searches help everyone within the classroom.

3.2       the ability to use a wide variety of responsive instructional strategies and methodologies to accommodate learning styles of individual learners and support their growth as social, intellectual, physical and spiritual beings– Use of group work as well as the Jigsaw Teaching strategy helps to accommodate all learners and, furthermore, helps to ensure the success of all members of the classroom.

 4.2      the ability to incorporate First Nations, Metis, and Inuit knowledge, content and perspective into all teaching areas- FNMI content is in both the book that is being studied as well as the students responses to this content. Furthermore, FNMI knowledge is important in adequately interpreting the picture stories.

4.3       the capacity to engage in program planning to shape ‘lived curriculum’ that brings learner needs, subject matter, and contextual variables together in developmentally appropriate, culturally responsive and meaningful ways- The inclusion of the speaker allows the students to see that this has more effect than simply within stories. This emotional connection with the speaker makes the students “live the curriculum” and work towards reconciliation as well as decolonization. In this way, the students take what they are learning from this unit and apply it to their everyday life becoming more active and engaged citizens within both their local and global communities.

Stage 2- Assessment
Assessment FOR Learning (formative) Assess the students during the learning to help determine next steps. 

KWL charts to track students prior knowledge as well as the knowledge they gain from the lesson. Journal entries (as a continuation of the reading journal) in the same style as the students did during the reading of Three Day Road

-1 or 2 quotes that are important (to the chapter, book, characters, or reader) and an explanation of its importance (sentence or point form).

-Paragraph about the readers thoughts, connections, and reactions to the videos (Rosenblatt’s The Reader, The Text, The Poem- What do the words on the page do in the mind of the reader)

-(Minimum 10) Point form notes on what the reader has learnt about the characters, setting, time period, major events, etc… throughout all videos altogether (not 10 per video)

Assessment OF Learning (summative) Assess the students after learning to evaluate what they have learned.

This lesson is building to the Eye Witness Account/ report that answers the 5W’s and H for facts about what happened and uses descriptive details and then the presentation of these writings orally to the class as a “story.”

-Oral and symbolic tradition- mini-unit wrap up. Students present their personalized story orally to the class touching on the above details. Thus, students create a presentation from their “eye witness” account writing. (The Elder would have used descriptive details in his/her account of the events and, thus, is the scaffold of this project). Students create a picture journey (see picture story assignment) for the students to follow as they tell their story (visual stimuli).

Marking will be based upon: coherence, accuracy, understanding (of audience and material discussed), and detail. The extent of which will be co-created with my students and, thus, a rubric will be created based upon these topics linked into the outcomes and indicators within the curriculum.

Stage 3- Learning Plan- Motivational/Anticipatory Set

-KWL chart on Residential schools- what they know, what they want to know, and (at the end of class) what they learnt- I personally like KWL charts because they give a concrete understanding for both student and teacher about where the students are at and the knowledge that they are bringing into the classroom. (I am hoping that by the time they are in grade 10 they would have touched or, in detail, covered residential schools and their impact on Canadian culture and the Aboriginal peoples themselves. Depending on the responses from the students, my instruction can be adapted to include a more in depth analysis of Residential school impact.

-The videos can also be considered engaging materials as well.

-A quick precursor that this material can be uncomfortable but is still very important would be beneficial to all students as well as the recognition that this is Treaty 6 territory.

Main Procedures/Strategies:

  1. 20 minutes worth of video content looking at the Residential schools themselves as well as their impact. I am showing the students these videos because I am not the authority on this knowledge. I want them to learn from those that can provide for them the context and real life experiences (the truth) that I can only touch on especially because of my inclusion in the dominant culture. Acknowledging this fact is important to show that these are not my stories but that I support the people whose stories they are.

It Matters: The Legacy of Residential School by The WSO Canada (YouTube).- (Approx. 5 mins) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rxGtnKUT0ms

-This resource is a quick blurb about residential schools from another perspective rather than simply “white.” It also looks at the persecution of the Sikh people as well and what they think about the residential schools as well. These resource looks at two stories of oppression and shows that this is not an isolated incident and we need to be better.

– The Impact of Residential Schools on Aboriginal Healthcare | Dawn Tisdale | TEDxComoxValley- (Approx. 10 mins needed) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kMvn_mSsykE

-Ted talks are an excellent resource. This talk looks at a more personalized account of learning about residential school. This will connect with the students because they will be learning about residential schools in the same way as this young woman. Good use of storytelling to get a point across.

Heritage Minutes: Chanie Wenjack-(1 minute)- Written by Joseph Boyden https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v_tcCpKtoU0

New Heritage Minute explores dark history of residential schools-(approx. 2 and a half minutes)  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TK483UHGd7k

-These two resources give a quick glimpse into residential school life and are fairly hard hitting. They take a peek into another residential school survivor’s stories.

2a. 15 minute Discussion-

Why did we watch these videos?

What emotions do these videos foster? Why?

How have the relationships between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people in Canada been broken?

2b. 10 mins- Break into groups of 3 or 4 and then come together to share answers to the class (jigsaw method). Each student has to write in their journal about their group’s discussion. Each group gets a question with a change to discuss before and after the speaker.

How do the stories we have just viewed apply to Three Day Road? What are the similarities? Differences?

How do these stories apply to us as individuals? A class? A society? How have Canadians been denied a proper education about First Nations societies and their historical relationships with Canadians?

How do these stories apply to reconciliation? What is reconciliation? What positive actions can be taken to bring about reconciliation?

-This lesson is a precursor to the Elder talk. I believe that going through this lesson will allow the students a better background to what the Elder is saying and will provide context for the students. Hearing the personalized account of the Residential school will (most likely) foster heavy emotions and this has to be told to the students beforehand.

Day 2-

I would like to make this a place-based lesson and have the kids go listen to an Elder at Wanuskewin Heritage Park or another outside area. In this way, it gets them out of the classroom and more connected to the land and the stories that come from it. This, in my opinion, will allow the students

1.      Talk by an Elder (approx. 30 mins). Leading with the presentation of tobacco and the asking if they will share their knowledge with the students on their experiences with Residential Schools. Thanking of the Elder.

2.      Discussion on what the students learnt from the Elder. How does this apply to the questions you are discussing from last class?

3.      Journal entries about what they experienced in the Elder talk (using the same journal format as laid out in the formative assessment section) (approx. 10 mins). I also want the students to write about the 5 W’s and H (Who, What, Where, When, Why, and How) from the Elders talk in preparation for the personalized Eye Witness Account/ report.

Day 3-

1.      10 minutes to discuss any changes the students need to make within their presentation- Group presentations approximately 10 mins each

2.      See Closing.

Adaptations/Differentiation:

-Guest Speaker

-Flexible timeframes

-Possible place-based education and/ or field trip opportunity (out of desk/ conventional classroom)

-See Unit Adaptations and Differentiation

Closing of lesson: (Last class) (Each day has a mini closing throughout the plan)

Finish KWL chart about what the students have learnt as well as how this ties into the wrap-up project. Use the rest of the time to write in journals.

 

M. Wilkinson ’16 *Adapted from Understanding by Design (McTighe and Wiggins, 1998)